• We're currently experiencing a minor issue with our email system preventing emails for new registrations and verifications going out. We're currently working to fix this
  • Be sure to join the discussion on our discord at: Discord.gg/serebii
  • If you're still waiting for the e-mail, be sure to check your junk/spam e-mail folders

Can the oppressed be racist to the oppressors?

MotostokeOnTrent

PokéJungle writer
I think antisemitism became a topic last time around because it highlights some of the issues that arise when you try to export 'whiteness' as a concept outside of the US. Many Jews have white skin and are generally highly-educated, with higher-than-average earnings and good jobs - factors that seem to be associated with 'whiteness' - but they remain one of the most persecuted groups on the planet. What was perhaps the worst event in human history was inflicted on a broadly-successful group of white people (regardless of whether they were religious practitioners or not), which suggests 'whiteness' analysis looks pretty ropey outside of a US context.

Muslim isn't a race.
Not strictly speaking, no, but prejudice against people from Muslim-majority countries or cultures is very clearly a thing (which also speaks to how closely Islam is tied to cultural identity and systems of government). 'Islamophobia' might not be a perfect word given how it's entirely legitimate to be afraid of the tenets of just about any religion (especially Islam) but we all know what the word really means well enough that it's perfectly functional.
 
Last edited:

Auraninja

Try to understand.
Muslim isn't a race.
I think you missed the point of what I was trying to say.

To quote myself in another thread:

Islamophobia gets into racism territory. If someone looks and talks like a Muslim, then they will probably still be discriminated against.
 

SBaby

Dungeon Master
To answer the main question, it depends on who you consider to be the oppressed. Everyone nowadays is going to have their own opinion on who's being oppressed and who's the oppressor, especially with different countries having different peoples that have the advantage at the time. So all I can say is it depends. It's not the best answer, but it's the only answer I can think of that at least covers most bases.
 

Pokemon Fan

Knuckle Trainer
To my knowledge the definition of racism is not at all dependent on how powerful/privileged the racist is compared to the race they are racist against, all that's really required to count as racism is to believe negative things about a person based purely on the race that they are. It doesn't even require any actions or harm be administered, it's purely about the beliefs the racist has toward someone. To believe that only oppressors can be racist would require a different definition of racism. The difference is that whoever is of a race that is more powerful in a given society is going to be able to more effectively turn racist beliefs into racist actions/harm as it will be harder/less acceptable to stop them. Even that scenario is simplifying things too much though.
 

Gamzee Makara

Let people enjoy things...
To my knowledge the definition of racism is not at all dependent on how powerful/privileged the racist is compared to the race they are racist against, all that's really required to count as racism is to believe negative things about a person based purely on the race that they are. It doesn't even require any actions or harm be administered, it's purely about the beliefs the racist has toward someone. To believe that only oppressors can be racist would require a different definition of racism. The difference is that whoever is of a race that is more powerful in a given society is going to be able to more effectively turn racist beliefs into racist actions/harm as it will be harder/less acceptable to stop them. Even that scenario is simplifying things too much though.
Dismissing the systemic model is being way too literal. Power+prejudice=racism.
 

MackBlasta

Member
Racism is alive and well in minority communities. Just because we're conditioned to think of racism from minority people (particularly blacks) as less serious than racism from white people doesn't make it any less wrong.
 
Top