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Pokemon biology

Mega Altaria

☆~Shiny hunter▢~
Pokémon is a world with its own internal logic. Every choice made out-of-universe has an in-universe consequence. We're talking about those in-universe consequences here, not the out-of-universe decisions.
But you're missing the point that the fact that all fossil Pokémon are Rock-type is influenced by the fact that most fossil specimens in real life are embedded into rock. That is then why almost all of the fossils in the Pokémon games are rock-based, with the exception of the Old Amber, which a very obvious link can be seen between the Rock typings of fossil Pokémon and the rock-based fossils in the Pokémon games.
 

Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
But you're missing the point that the fact that all fossil Pokémon are Rock-type is influenced by the fact that most fossil specimens in real life are embedded into rock. That is then why almost all of the fossils in the Pokémon games are rock-based, with the exception of the Old Amber, which a very obvious link can be seen between the Rock typings of fossil Pokémon and the rock-based fossils in the Pokémon games.
I'm not missing that point. I fully understand it. Yes, the designers of the games made Fossil Pokémon Rock-Types due to the association between fossils and rocks, but that is not an in-universe biological reason for why they are all Rock-Types. There's a difference between the two.

Think about it this way. If someone asks the question "why are there no Mega Evolutions before Gen VI, there are two answers to that questions. The out-of-universe answer is that Mega Evolutions hadn't been made yet. But then there's the in-universe answer, which is Gen VI and VII games take place in a parallel timeline where AZ's Ultimate Weapon was activated and created Mega Stones and Kay Stones. While both answers are correct, it's the in-universe that threads like this are concerned about.
 
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Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
Maybe their Types changed after they were revived similar to how Genesect changed after being revived.
I've never liked that theory much myself. Seeing as the Pokémon all learn Rock-Type moves through their level up movest, with many of them being moves that are inherently natural for that Pokémon to learn, it seems to imply to me that they're naturally Rock-Types. And like I said earlier, the living fossil Relicanth being a Rock-Type without undergoing the revival process possibly implies that the typing is natural for Pokémon of the era. Something I just though of too is that we have the move Ancient Power, the quintessential Fossil Pokémon move, is also a Rock-Type. The fact that the move is so synonymous with Fossil Pokémon and other ancient Pokémon implies that it's a move that could be learned naturally by most, if not all, Pokémon from the era of Fossil Pokémon. It being a Rock-Type move perhaps implies a relationship between the type and the Pokémon of the era.
 

Pikachu Fan Number Nine

Don't Mess wit Texas
Packs of wild Lycanroc can attack humans if they see said human as a threat. Occasionally Lycanroc attacks on humans can be fatal. This is not unlike real life wolf attacks.
 

Mega Altaria

☆~Shiny hunter▢~
I'm not missing that point. I fully understand it. Yes, the designers of the games made Fossil Pokémon Rock-Types due to the association between fossils and rocks, but that is not an in-universe biological reason for why they are all Rock-Types. There's a difference between the two.
But are you also aware of the lack of canon and canonical hints around why all fossil Pokémon are Rock-type? Which leads to in-game fan theories that seek to explain that matter but are however speculation-based theories can just be made up on the spot like 'Fossil Pokémon are Rock-type because their environments used to have a lot of rock'. But don't get me wrong here. While I do believe speculation can allow discussions to expand, but I personally don't like entire discussions to be completely speculative. And note it doesn't lead to one set explanation, but there will be multiple explanations as well.

But it may even be possible that rock-based environments would have influenced their typing if you want another of those reasons.
 

Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
But are you also aware of the lack of canon and canonical hints around why all fossil Pokémon are Rock-type? Which leads to in-game fan theories that seek to explain that matter but are however speculation-based theories can just be made up on the spot like 'Fossil Pokémon are Rock-type because their environments used to have a lot of rock'. But don't get me wrong here. While I do believe speculation can allow discussions to expand, but I personally don't like entire discussions to be completely speculative. And note it doesn't lead to one set explanation, but there will be multiple explanations as well.

But it may even be possible that rock-based environments would have influenced their typing if you want another of those reasons.
Okay, if you don't like that sort of theorizing, that's fine, but it's also the purpose of this thread. The thread is literally called Pokémon Biology, and was created to discuss the biology (which is inherently an in-universe concept) of the Pokémon world. Not trying to be rude, but you might not want to be here if you don't like the very thing this thread was created to discuss. And hey, at least I pointed out and explained evidence for my speculation, which is more than some people on this thread can say.
 
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Mega Altaria

☆~Shiny hunter▢~
Okay, if you don't like that sort of theorizing, that's fine, but it's also the purpose of this thread. The thread is literally called Pokémon Biology, and was created to discuss the biology (which is inherently an in-universe concept) of the Pokémon world. Not trying to be rude, but you might not want to be here if you don't like the very thing this thread was created to discuss. And hey, at least I pointed out and explained evidence for my speculation, which is more than some people on this thread can say.
Fine, but it should be up to us to decide on if aspects of real-life biology can be applied to the Pokémon world or that Pokémon have their unique biology, in which you obviously prefer the latter.

Besides, what I also find interesting is that in some of Kabuto's Pokédex entries, it is stated that there are living Kabuto in a very specific region and fossil evidence has been found, hence Kabuto can be considered to be a living fossil.
 

RedJirachi

Veteran member
I've never liked that theory much myself. Seeing as the Pokémon all learn Rock-Type moves through their level up movest, with many of them being moves that are inherently natural for that Pokémon to learn, it seems to imply to me that they're naturally Rock-Types. And like I said earlier, the living fossil Relicanth being a Rock-Type without undergoing the revival process possibly implies that the typing is natural for Pokémon of the era. Something I just though of too is that we have the move Ancient Power, the quintessential Fossil Pokémon move, is also a Rock-Type. The fact that the move is so synonymous with Fossil Pokémon and other ancient Pokémon implies that it's a move that could be learned naturally by most, if not all, Pokémon from the era of Fossil Pokémon. It being a Rock-Type move perhaps implies a relationship between the type and the Pokémon of the era.
The Ultra Sun Pokedex entry of Tyrantrum states complete reconstruction is impossible, and that it is thought to have had feathers. So the idea that at least some of these Pokemon may have been modified to have the Rock type is possible. As for Relicanth, it's possible the reason it didn't go extinct like the other fossil Pokemon is because it was part Rock type
 

Mega Altaria

☆~Shiny hunter▢~
As for Relicanth, it's possible the reason it didn't go extinct like the other fossil Pokemon is because it was part Rock type
That part Rock-type could be a result of its hard scales, which can be compared to craggy rocks. That could have been a defense mechanism for Relicanth, in which its scales were so tough and impenetrable that would have kept predators away so it didn't really need to adapt further and allowed it to maintain its population.
 

RedJirachi

Veteran member
We don't know what the worlds where the Poipole line, Blacephalon and Stakataka are like. What do you think they're like?
 

Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
We don't know what the worlds where the Poipole line, Blacephalon and Stakataka are like. What do you think they're like?
Given Poipole's Pokédex description in Ultra Sun, mentioning how it's essentially a starter Pokémon for the denizens of the Ultra Megalopolis, I would assume that the world of the Ultra Megalopolis is its native corner of Ultra Space. From what we know, the normal citizens of that world do not travel to other areas of Ultra Space commonly, it is only the Ultra Recon Squad that does, so in order for normal people to get a Poipole as a partner, it would have to come from their part of Ultra Space.
 

Orphalesion

Well-Known Member
On the fossils, I've speculated in the past that, theoretically, it might only be Rock pokemon that fossilize in such a way that you can still revive them after millions of years. After all they're rock....with DNA...maybe that "rock DNA" doesn't decay in the same way normal DNA does?
Mega Aerodactyl is, after all, said to be closer to it's original form in the lore, with the revival process accidently filtering out its rock thorns.

Of course if they ever were to make "primal" or "original" forms of the Fossil Pokemon you can bet they'd give them other types.
 

Pikachu Fan Number Nine

Don't Mess wit Texas
All Pokemon based on rodents and lagomorphs have the same growing incisors that characterize their real-life counterparts, and must constantly gnaw on hard surfaces to keep them from growing too big.
 

Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
All Pokemon based on rodents and lagomorphs have the same growing incisors that characterize their real-life counterparts, and must constantly gnaw on hard surfaces to keep them from growing too big.
Tell me, have you ever seen such incisors on the likes of Pikachu or Buneary? Yes, some, or even most, like Rattata, Dedenne, and Bunnelby have them, but it's clear from looking that not every Pokémon based off of rodents and lagomorphs have such incisors. And with how much we've seen of Pikachu, if it had them, we would have seen them by now.
 

Pikachu Fan Number Nine

Don't Mess wit Texas
They don't have to be visible for the Pokemon to have them.
 

Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
They don't have to be visible for the Pokemon to have them.
If they're not visible, then they're probably not going to grow large enough to necessitate the gnawing to shorten them in the first place.

And don't say that they've just happen to keep them short enough to not be visible for every instance we've seen, seeing as the anime has shown us countless Pikachu, and it is the one Pokémon that has had more screen time than any other Pokémon, and not a single one has ever had visible incisors. If they're teeth growing too large was really something that could happen with Pikachu, we logically would have seen an example by now.
 

RedJirachi

Veteran member
Anyone get Pennywise vibes from Blacephalon?
 

Gumzilla

Member
So I found a reason for Snivy and Servine to have limbs despite being snakes! Perhaps Game Freak took inspiration from this extinct snake!

This is the Tetrapodophis. An ancient constrictor with stubby limbs, not unlike Snivy and Servine's!
 

AuroraBeam

Well-Known Member
I was always under the impression that the fossil 'mons were always rock type. I had the idea that primordial poke-earth just had harsh enough environmental conditions that anything living in those times would need to be part rock type (they're suppose to be a resilient type) by default. But hearing the idea that the typing comes from the fossilization itself is interesting. Playing through Sapphire again made me realize that the llieep & anorith lines could easily have been part water at one point.
 
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