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Single Rates - READ THE FIRST POST

Onyx Tanuki

Ma! There's a weird 'nuki in the yahd!
142.gif

Aerodactyl @Aerodactylite
Tough Claws
-Rock Slide
-Roost
-Crunch
-Aerial Ace/ An elemental fang/ E.Q
Jolly
252/252 Spd + Atk 4 HP

So I want to create a fast attacking mega aerodactyl set but I'm unsure on what moves to have on it. I don't know what Pokemon is struggles to beat the most so certain moves may be replaced in order for more coverage. What's a normal set for this guy?

First, I'd suggest putting the extra EVs into Def or SpDef rather than HP; the standard rule is that anything weak to Rocks should have an odd HP value so it can switch in more times while Stealth Rock is in place. Jolly with max Speed and Attack is definitely the way to go, as it gets a nice boost in power thanks to Tough Claws and can naturally outspeed pretty much anything except Deoxys-Speed and Ninjask, and speed ties with Jolly/Timid 252 Speed Deoxys-Normal, Deoxys-Attack, and Mega Alakazam. Keep in mind, though, that you could still be outsped by Scarfers with base 84 and higher Speed running Jolly/Timid natures, so watch out for them. Anyway, standard moveset is Stone Edge, Aqua Tail, Fire Fang, Aerial Ace, but you could also consider Rock Slide, Crunch, Ice Fang, Thunder Fang, Iron Head, and Earthquake as offensive options (though keep in mind EQ doesn't get Tough Claws boost, nor do any of Aerodactyl's Rock STABs). I'm not too familiar with OU so I don't know what the most threatening things would be there, but you can set it up with whatever moves you feel will help it handle threats best.
 

calvin_0

Gardevoir Lover
I just hatch a shiny modest female Amaura with 31 in everything but speed.

my original play was to hatch a modest Amaura with 31 in everything but Atk and was going to train her with as follow

Name: Aurorus @ Weakness Policy
Nature: Modest
Evs: 252 hp, 252 sp.atk, 6, spd
Move:
-Rock Polish
-Freeze-Dry
-Thunderbolt
-Ancient Rock\ Hyperbeam


I was going to use her in Battle Maison, the idea was set up rock polish, take a super effective hit and hit until she falls in battle.

but now i got a shiny without 31 spd, so i'm not sure rock polish is still viable and i want to use her, its not very often that i hatch a shiny of a pokemon that i want, not to mention its female.

so i hope you guys can give me some suggestion in this regard.

thanks.
 

Onyx Tanuki

Ma! There's a weird 'nuki in the yahd!
I just hatch a shiny modest female Amaura with 31 in everything but speed.

my original play was to hatch a modest Amaura with 31 in everything but Atk and was going to train her with as follow

Name: Aurorus @ Weakness Policy
Nature: Modest
Evs: 252 hp, 252 sp.atk, 6, spd
Move:
-Rock Polish
-Freeze-Dry
-Thunderbolt
-Ancient Rock\ Hyperbeam


I was going to use her in Battle Maison, the idea was set up rock polish, take a super effective hit and hit until she falls in battle.

but now i got a shiny without 31 spd, so i'm not sure rock polish is still viable and i want to use her, its not very often that i hatch a shiny of a pokemon that i want, not to mention its female.

so i hope you guys can give me some suggestion in this regard.

thanks.

With Aurorus's typing Weakness Policy has a pretty good chance of working, but keep in mind that even with Rock Polish, it's not necessarily going to be outspeeding a huge number of threats. You didn't say what exactly its Speed IV is, but if we were to assume it's 0 IVs and 252 EVs with Modest nature, then with a Rock Polish, your Aurorus would hit 368 Speed at Lv 100. This means it'll get outsped by anything above 115 base Speed, as well as Scarfers above base 60 Speed, so with its EVs mostly uninvested, that means you'll probably need two Rock Polishes to ensure you outspeed things.

I'd have to say that with Freeze-Dry, Thunderbolt becomes somewhat pointless. Since Water types resist Fire and Ice already it's very unlikely you'll find one with Thick Fat, so Freeze-Dry should hit them hard, and since it's Ice it already takes care of Flying types. I'd probably use Dark Pulse, Psychic, or Hidden Power [Ground] over Thunderbolt myself to help Aurorus hit opposing Ice and Steel types harder. Hyperbeam might be good if you expect to outspeed the opponent and need a last-ditch high-power attack but otherwise it isn't all that good. Ancient Power/Hidden Power [Rock] are options, while a good move to utilize Refrigerate might be Nature Power (which causes Aurorus to use Tri-Attack inside buildings). Return could be viable if you go with a different nature so you have something to hit Specially defensive pokemon with.
 

Rocxidi

The Jim Reaper
Found a Chandelure in my box, handling a pretty decent set I gave it. Will probably replace Infernape in my gym...

Chandelure @ Life Orb / Charcoal
Ability: Flash Fire / Infiltrator
EVs: 252 SpA / 252 Spe / 4 HP
Modest Nature
- Flame Charge
- Fire Blast
- Shadow Ball
- Energy Ball / Hidden Power Fighting

With its Special Attack stat sitting at a wonderful 145, Chandelure can hit pretty darn hard without a boost. The only problem Chandelure has is its Speed, sitting at a nice 80 that can outspeed a handful of things after a boost. Fire Blast's immense power can destroy things not packing enough investment in bulk, while Shadow Ball provides an alternate STAB move that hits pretty hard this gen. Energy Ball hits water types and rock types, giving you nice coverage, but Hidden Power Fighting earns you perfect coverage, allowing you to hit things you couldn't otherwise, such as Hydreigon. Life Orb provides a general boost while Charcoal boosts both Flame Charge and Fire Blast. Flash Fire gets you an extra boost while Infiltrator goes through subs and screens.
 

saPower1000

FLIP ALL THE TABLES
Posted this in the wrong thread at first.

zygarde.gif

Zygarde @ Leftovers
Ability: Aura Break
EVs: 200 HP/Def; 110 Atk
Nature: Brave (preferably it should be adamant, but it was my first catch and has 4 Perfect IVs so I took it).
- Glare
- Dragon Dance
- Rock Slide
- Earthquake
My favorite Dragon type so far. I have done really well with this set.

The main premise of this set is to Glare its checks and counters when they switch in to try and force it out, and either setup on them, or sweep late game after the paralyzed check/counter is dealt with.
It works best as a lead for me, as that way I can lure out threats and cripple them nicely for Pokemon that have good psynergy with it (like M-Heracross) to finish them off later. It also has its own version of ParaFlinch going for it with RockSlide, and has the best bulk of the Glare users to pull it off. Also a solid check to Talonflame, as it is 3HKOed by Banded sets, and 4HKOed otherwise, while being able to OHKO most TalonFlame variants with Rockslide and no boost needed. Also works really well with Heatran, as Zygarde can sponge Earthquakes pretty well, even from Pokemon like M-Garchomp, and Heatran takes care of the Ice/Dragon type moves. Of course, they both will be OHKOed by M-Garchomp after they take a hit if it uses a super effective move, but for Pokemon like Hippowdon and Tyranitar, they work real well together.

252 Atk Mega Garchomp Earthquake vs. 200 HP / 200 Def Zygarde: 144-171 (35.3 - 42%) -- 86.7% chance to 3HKO after Leftovers recovery

Thoughts on this/ or improvements that can be made?
 

Cosmic Fury

Evil Overlord
Being rather new to the X & Y metagame (as I never played on it much after its inception), I've decided to come to you guys with a couple of sets (one post at a time), to see if they're actually as effective these days as they used to be.

The first was a very trollish Ninetales set I used to some considerable success in Black & White, late in the metagame. Its main niche was found in three ways: throwing off opponents with a completely nonstandard set, supporting teammates by crippling opposing Pokemon (to an extent it normally could not do), and giving itself some actual survivability at critical points where such a thing would be completely impossible.

Here's the set.

Ninetales @ Leftovers
Ability: Drought
Nature: Timid (-Atk +Spd)
EVs: 252 SpAtk, 252 Spd

-- Overheat
-- Hidden Power [Ground]
-- Power Swap (with Nasty Plot/Calm Mind as fallback options)
-- Will-O-Wisp

This set is only meant to do one thing: Cripple them fast and get out before they do. The leftovers are there because this is Ninetales' only form of recovery, as it will be supporting other teammates, as opposed to the other way around in 5th Gen. While the weather nerf hurt its usefulness and longevity badly, this Ninetales is by no means a slouch -- it can and will put the hurt on anything it can get to with its attacks.

This set's flagship move is Overheat. While Ninetales doesn't hit nearly as hard as most other Pokemon, its Drought ability serves to amp up Overheat's power and give it a good buffer against Water-type attacks that might be flung its way. (Given that it has a good SpDef stat, it's a considerably good thing in the long run.)

With Overheat's great damage comes great recoil, and Power Swap is there to turn that recoil into Ninetales' advantage by halving the opponent's Special Attack. This frees up Ninetales for yet another turn in which to use Overheat, and the process can be repeated as many times as it's able before it dies or is forced out of the field by one of its many checks or counters.

Given the fact that the Special side of things is all but taken care of, there remains a need to take care of physical attackers as well, so that they can't hurt Ninetales' nearly as much. Will-O-Wisp is Ninetales' answer to this call, and with its handy 328 speed, it dispatches all but the fastest of users reliably (if its poor accuracy doesn't take its toll). With Will-O-Wisp combined with the Overheat + Power Swap combo, Ninetales finds itself defended on both sides of the damage spectrum, and thus allows its teammates a free switch-in for a few short turns, before it's needed again.

Unfortunately, there are plenty of hard counters to this combo. Hidden Power Ground helps mitigate some of these threats, such as Heatran, who isn't hurt by Overheat, especially if it switches in before Ninetales can fire off a Power Swap to drop already-dropped stats onto an opponent. In addition, the only thing it can do with most Rock types like Tyranitar (who can easily tank Special moves) is burn them and then switch out.

Overall, this set is best used when you let it come in on stuff that it hits neutrally, so that it can start to work its magic BEFORE the opponent sends out their threats to it. That is when Ninetales and its stat-dropping effects can work their wonders for your team. Granted, it's definitely not the best hit-and-run Pokemon out there, but it's definitely a fun set to use from my personal experience.
 

TurtwigAndSquirtle

I like turtles
Wash Rotom @ Leftovers
Hydro Pump
Signal Beam
Thunderbolt
Will-O-Wisp
Ability: Levitate
EVs: 252 Sp. Atk, 252 Speed, 4 HP
Nature: Timid

Hydro Pump is a really good STAB attack. Signal Beam gets grasses out of the way and can confuse. Thunderbolt is a nice STAB and can paralyse. Will-O-Wisp burns the opponent,.
This set can hit hard and annoy.
 
Last edited:

Rocxidi

The Jim Reaper
Wash Rotom @ Leftovers
Hydro Pump
Signal Beam
Thunderbolt
Will-O-Wisp
Ability: Levitate
EVs: 252 Sp. Atk, 252 Speed, 4 HP
Nature: Timid

Hydro Pump is a really good STAB attack. Signal Beam gets grasses out of the way and can confuse. Thunderbolt is a nice STAB and can paralyse. Will-O-Wisp burns the opponent,.
This set can hit hard and annoy.

Since you've got Signal Beam here, I assume you've got access to Pain Split. In that case, use it over Signal Beam for recovery. Move the EVs to HP and Defense/Special Defense and use a Bold/Calm nature instead.
 

Lord Fighting

Bank Ball Collector
Since you've got Signal Beam here, I assume you've got access to Pain Split. In that case, use it over Signal Beam for recovery. Move the EVs to HP and Defense/Special Defense and use a Bold/Calm nature instead.

And you can't have a Rotom-W without volt switch. That's one of the many reasons this think is so annoying. Replace t.bolt with volt switch, add in pain split or rest for recovery by replacing signal beam and make it max def/sp.sdef and HP. This thing is an annoying wall that doesn't stop volt switching, not an attacker.
 

Lord Fighting

Bank Ball Collector
Here is my team, I personally think I did pretty good making it, I am willing accept any help though.

Also the reason I usually don't use special attack or attack boosting items is because I don't think these items are required in order to win, and I'm right, I have several times managed to do just fine without items like that.

Also, I'm not asking whether or not I should use these Pokémon, so keep that in mind. What I am asking is if the moveset, EVs, Nature and the item I gave them are good for them.

Anyway here is the team I'm using:

Greninja
Nature: Modest
Ability: Protean
+252 Special Attack
+252 Speed

Moveset:
Hydro Pump
Ice Beam
Dark Pulse
Grass Knot.

Why I chose this Pokémon/moveset: Well, I think that Greninja's hype is real, so I decided why not give this one a chance. Usually I like to have creative movesets, but since this moveset looks great I'm going for it.

Delphox
Nature: Modest
Ability: Blaze
+252 Special Attack
+128 Special Defense
+128 Speed

Fire Blast
Psychic
Toxic
Calm Mind

Why I chose this Pokémon/moveset: It's my favorite Pokémon of the sixth generation. And I do love using it a lot, it's also one of my favorite fire-types. I have used it several times before and will gladly do it again. Yeah, I know a lot of people hate it, which I'm fine with, but I'm not gonna let that discourage me from using it.

Ursaring
Nature: Adamant
Item: Toxic orb
Ability: Quick feet
+4 HP
+252 Attack
+252 Speed

Moveset:
Crunch
Earthquake
Facade
Hammer Arm

Why I chose this Pokémon/moveset: Well, Ursaring isn't a Pokémon many people use which is exactly the reason I wanna use it. I love its very high attack stat, and if I can use it properly (whcih I'm sure I could) I could beat some Pokémon with it.

Conkeldurr
Nature: Adamant
Ability: Iron Fist
Item: Assault vest
+252 Attack
+48 Defense
+48 Special defense
+148 Speed

Moveset:
Hammer Arm
Mach Punch
Ice Punch
Stone Edge

Why I chose this Pokémon/moveset: Conkeldurr is one of my favorite Pokémon, and for good reasons too. I know people have told me that using hammer arm is not a good idea, but I still love that move. It has very high base power and is very useful. The downside of that move is not a big deal to Conkeldurr as it doesn't have very good speed to begin with.

Golem
Nature: Adamant
Item: Assault Vest
Ability: Sturdy
+252 Attack
+148 Defense
+108 Speed

Moveset:
Earthquake
Fire punch
Rock Blast
Hammer Arm

Why I chose this Pokémon/moveset: It's my favorite rock-type Pokémon. And I personally think that anyone who says that Golem is terrible because it can be knocked out easily are totally overlooking the fact that the ability sturdy allows it to attack before it gets knocked down.

Rayquaza
Nature: Modest
+252 Special Attack
+252 Speed

Moveset:
Fire Blast
Blizzard
Air Slash
Draco Meteor

Why I chose this Pokémon/moveset: I still love this Pokémon even to this day. I chose these moves because they are all very powerful.

I will be using all these Pokémon in the battle I'll upload on YouTube two weeks from now. I know a lot of them might not be the best Pokémon out there, but my goal is not to use the best, I wanna use the Pokémon I like using so yeah.

If you can tell me what you guys think of these movesets and EV spreads that would be great, thank you.

This thread is for single Pokemon only. Go to the RMT section to get a team like this evaluated.
 

Lord Fighting

Bank Ball Collector

Onyx Tanuki

Ma! There's a weird 'nuki in the yahd!
Being rather new to the X & Y metagame (as I never played on it much after its inception), I've decided to come to you guys with a couple of sets (one post at a time), to see if they're actually as effective these days as they used to be.

The first was a very trollish Ninetales set I used to some considerable success in Black & White, late in the metagame. Its main niche was found in three ways: throwing off opponents with a completely nonstandard set, supporting teammates by crippling opposing Pokemon (to an extent it normally could not do), and giving itself some actual survivability at critical points where such a thing would be completely impossible.

Here's the set.

Ninetales @ Leftovers
Ability: Drought
Nature: Timid (-Atk +Spd)
EVs: 252 SpAtk, 252 Spd

-- Overheat
-- Hidden Power [Ground]
-- Power Swap (with Nasty Plot/Calm Mind as fallback options)
-- Will-O-Wisp

This set is only meant to do one thing: Cripple them fast and get out before they do. The leftovers are there because this is Ninetales' only form of recovery, as it will be supporting other teammates, as opposed to the other way around in 5th Gen. While the weather nerf hurt its usefulness and longevity badly, this Ninetales is by no means a slouch -- it can and will put the hurt on anything it can get to with its attacks.

This set's flagship move is Overheat. While Ninetales doesn't hit nearly as hard as most other Pokemon, its Drought ability serves to amp up Overheat's power and give it a good buffer against Water-type attacks that might be flung its way. (Given that it has a good SpDef stat, it's a considerably good thing in the long run.)

With Overheat's great damage comes great recoil, and Power Swap is there to turn that recoil into Ninetales' advantage by halving the opponent's Special Attack. This frees up Ninetales for yet another turn in which to use Overheat, and the process can be repeated as many times as it's able before it dies or is forced out of the field by one of its many checks or counters.

Given the fact that the Special side of things is all but taken care of, there remains a need to take care of physical attackers as well, so that they can't hurt Ninetales' nearly as much. Will-O-Wisp is Ninetales' answer to this call, and with its handy 328 speed, it dispatches all but the fastest of users reliably (if its poor accuracy doesn't take its toll). With Will-O-Wisp combined with the Overheat + Power Swap combo, Ninetales finds itself defended on both sides of the damage spectrum, and thus allows its teammates a free switch-in for a few short turns, before it's needed again.

Unfortunately, there are plenty of hard counters to this combo. Hidden Power Ground helps mitigate some of these threats, such as Heatran, who isn't hurt by Overheat, especially if it switches in before Ninetales can fire off a Power Swap to drop already-dropped stats onto an opponent. In addition, the only thing it can do with most Rock types like Tyranitar (who can easily tank Special moves) is burn them and then switch out.

Overall, this set is best used when you let it come in on stuff that it hits neutrally, so that it can start to work its magic BEFORE the opponent sends out their threats to it. That is when Ninetales and its stat-dropping effects can work their wonders for your team. Granted, it's definitely not the best hit-and-run Pokemon out there, but it's definitely a fun set to use from my personal experience.

The strategy is actually pretty ingenious. At first I was a bit iffy, like, "Why is he running Overheat over Flamethrower or Fire Blast or Heat Wave? Why is he even bothering with Power Trick?" Then I realized that Overheat is the SpAtt reduction attack for Fire, and that Power Trick passes stat boosts rather than the actual stats (I was somehow thinking of Power Swap instead) and it clicked. Running off of Sun, Overheat can demolish even a lot of things that resist it, and you can Power Trick onto special attackers while Will-Oing physical attackers or anything that you can afford to take a turn getting rid of your SpAtt drop against.

I think if I'd swap anything it'd be HP Ground for Solarbeam, Energy Ball, or HP Rock. Both Solarbeam and Energy Ball pair great with a Fire attack, with Solarbeam also taking advantage of Sun and Energy Ball a stronger option when you can't rely on the Sun boost. However, these leave you walled by Fire types. In fact, Fire/Flying walls you even if you keep HP Ground, which is why I suggested changing it to Rock; while there's a handful of pokemon that still resist both moves, Fire/Rock actually has slightly better neutral coverage, and if your opponent tries to hard-switch into Charizard or Talonflame expecting a Solarbeam, you can surprise them. I think the only thing you'll be losing significant coverage against would be Heatran (which is still hit neutrally by HP Rock anyway) and the handful of Ground/Rock pokemon that you'd probably be able to handle with your other teammates.

One thing to note: if you're using this in Pokemon Showdown, I think both Drought and Drizzle are still banned from UU down. I can somewhat understand since there's a LOT of pokemon in lower tiers that benefit from Sun and Rain, but then the reason they're in the lower tiers to begin with is because they can't benefit from Sun and Rain as effectively now. Anyway, you'll have to run this without Drought if you put it lower than OU, and I believe Ninetails is NU anyway and doesn't really have the stats to be competitive in that tier without a good amount of support. Especially worrisome is Ninetails' frailty; particularly without any defensive investment, it's not going to be surviving an Earthquake or Rock Slide from most attackers, and despite its 100 base SpDef, I wouldn't rely on it to take Earth Power from something with good SpAtt, either. I'd say a good partner for this would be a bulky Grass type, like Torterra or Chesnaught, especially if you can get up Stealth Rock to handle Fire types that'd jump in on it. To be perfectly honest I don't think the set even requires Drought; it helps allow you to use another couple of Overheats before you have to Power Trick, but Flash Fire could work too if you predict a Fire move to be used on your Grass type.
 

saPower1000

FLIP ALL THE TABLES
Never got an answer, so I guess I'll repost this:

zygarde.gif

Zygarde @ Leftovers
Ability: Aura Break
EVs: 200 HP/Def; 110 Atk
Nature: Brave (preferably it should be adamant, but it was my first catch and has 4 Perfect IVs so I took it).
- Glare
- Dragon Dance
- Rock Slide
- Earthquake
My favorite Dragon type so far. I have done really well with this set.

The main premise of this set is to Glare its checks and counters when they switch in to try and force it out, and either setup on them, or sweep late game after the paralyzed check/counter is dealt with.
It works best as a lead for me, as that way I can lure out threats and cripple them nicely for Pokemon that have good psynergy with it (like M-Heracross) to finish them off later. It also has its own version of ParaFlinch going for it with RockSlide, and has the best bulk of the Glare users to pull it off. Also a solid check to Talonflame, as it is 3HKOed by Banded sets, and 4HKOed otherwise, while being able to OHKO most TalonFlame variants with Rockslide and no boost needed. Also works really well with Heatran, as Zygarde can sponge Earthquakes pretty well, even from Pokemon like M-Garchomp, and Heatran takes care of the Ice/Dragon type moves. Of course, they both will be OHKOed by M-Garchomp after they take a hit if it uses a super effective move, but for Pokemon like Hippowdon and Tyranitar, they work real well together.

252 Atk Mega Garchomp Earthquake vs. 200 HP / 200 Def Zygarde: 144-171 (35.3 - 42%) -- 86.7% chance to 3HKO after Leftovers recovery

Thoughts on this/ or improvements (especially with EV's) that can be made?
 

Machomacho

Well-Known Member
I was wondering if this Whimsicott set is viable

Whimsicott @Wide Lens
Ability: Prankster
Nature: Modest
EVs: 252 SpA/ 166 HP/ 90 Spd
Moves:
-Grasswhistle
-Hurricane
-Dream Eater
-filler
 

Onyx Tanuki

Ma! There's a weird 'nuki in the yahd!
I was wondering if this Whimsicott set is viable

Whimsicott @Wide Lens
Ability: Prankster
Nature: Modest
EVs: 252 SpA/ 166 HP/ 90 Spd
Moves:
-Grasswhistle
-Hurricane
-Dream Eater
-filler

In the competitive metagame, the combination of a Sleep move and Dream Eater isn't a very reliable strategy at all. This is especially true for Whimsicott, since it's stuck with using Grass Whistle, which I believe is the least accurate Sleep move, next to Sing. It's only 55% accurate, and even with Wide Lens this is only boosted to 60.5%, which I think is less than Hypnosis. Whimsicott doesn't have the bulk to just be sitting there blowing whistles all day, fishing for Sleep. Grass Whistle and Sing do have two major benefits over the more accurate Sleep Powder and Spore; they are sound moves, meaning they should be able to go through a Substitute, and they aren't powder moves, meaning they can affect Grass types and pokemon with Overcoat or Safety Goggles. This strategy might work IF Whimicott had access to, say, Infestation, or was in a Doubles team with Gothitelle or Dugtrio, but otherwise, it's best to shy away from this strategy, as there's FAR more useful ways to use a Whimsicott:

Whimsicott @ Leftovers
Prankster
Timid
248 HP, 252 Speed, 8 SpAtt
- Substitute
- Leech Seed
- Moonblast/Giga Drain/Energy Ball/Stun Spore
- Encore/Stun Spore

While it doesn't have great bulk, Whimsicott can be a really annoying pokemon to face off against due to Prankster and SubSeed strategy. The Substitute works well as a scouting move; if the opponent uses an attack that breaks it you can switch out, or if they use status or setup you can lock them into it with Encore or paralyze them with Stun Spore to cripple them. If you end up facing something Whimsicott can handle, Leech Seed and proceed to rock the opponent's world. If you really want you could eschew an attacking move to have both Encore and Stun Spore, but it's probably a good idea to instead keep an attack on hand in the event the opponent opens with Taunt; Moonblast is probably the best all-around, but Giga Drain and Energy Ball are also viable.

Whimsicott @ Choice Specs
Infiltrator
Timid
4 HP, 252 SpAtt, 252 Speed
- Moonblast
- Energy Ball
- Hurricane/Shadow Ball
- Switcheroo/Hidden Power [Rock]

Whimsicott isn't the greatest offensive presence either with only 77 base SpAtt, but if you get rid of the right threats it can still crush some souls. With this set we go for Infiltrator to keep the opponent from defending themselves with a Substitute and Choice Specs to maximize Whimsicott's offensive strength. Moonblast and Energy Ball are the obvious STABs here, and Switcheroo is great for locking down defensive pokemon or trapping physically offensive pokemon into a predicted setup move. The real question here is your coverage move. While Psychic is an option, I'd avid it since you already handle Fighting types with Moonblast and you would probably want to get rid of Poison types well ahead of time. Hurricane is the stronger option power-wise, but suffers from lower accuracy; Shadow Ball is weaker, but has 100% accuracy and much better synergy with the other types, only leaving Pyroar able to resist everything you do. I included HP Rock as an additional coverage move over Switcheroo, but chances are if you're going this route, you'd be better off with Mismagius, which gets access to a stronger special Rock move and has considerably better SpAtt to boot. In fact it also gets Trick, meaning the only thing that makes this particular set superior is dealing slightly better damage with Moonblast and Energy Ball and access to Infiltrator. It is absolutely an option to consider, though.

----------

seviper.gif

Seviper @ Assault Vest/Black Sludge
Infiltrator
Mild
252 HP, 4 Att, 252 SpAtt
- Sludge Wave/Sludge Bomb
- Giga Drain
- Flamethrower
- Dragon Tail

Seviper is something I don't really ever see, and I'm not entirely sure why. I suppose it's because, despite having excellent offenses on both sides and a great offensive movepool, it loses out by having kinda crappy speed and slightly below-average bulk. This set aims to fix the latter of those two issues to a degree using AV. Sludge Wave acts as STAB, though Sludge Bomb is just as viable; I just prefer the little bit of extra power to the added Poison chance in this case. Giga Drain offers recovery and hits those pesky Water/Ground types hard, and Flamethrower helps handle Steel types. If I see something that commonly sets up, Dragon Tail. The beauty of this is that, even if the opponent sets up a Substitute, unless it's a Fairy type, Dragon Tail will strike right through the Sub thanks to Infiltrator. Though this guy is gonna struggle a bit against strong physically-offensive pokemon that carry Ground and Psychic moves, he could last pretty well against special threats thanks to the AV and recovery from Giga Drain. If you're willing to drop some of that special bulk for added recover, there's always Black Sludge, and that also makes a good option if the opponent is predicted to Trick a Choice item onto you.

Seviper @ Choice Scarf
Infiltrator
Mild/Rash
176 Att, 80 SpAtt, 252 Speed
- Sludge Wave/Sludge Bomb
- Earthquake
- Flamethrower
- Dragon Tail/Knock Off

While the moveset looks fairly similar, this set plays considerably differently. This mixed set gives up bulk and replaces it with speed, supplemented by Choice Scarf. The EV spread ensures nearly identical offenses (I believe they set Att at 280 and SpAtt at 281) meaning you can hit just as hard with EQ as you can with Flamethrower. I opted to stick to a special STAB since Seviper's strongest physical Poison move is Poison Jab, which is 10 BP below Sludge Bomb, and Poison Fang is more fitting with a physical or mixed variant of the above AV set. Earthquake offers great coverage and is just an overall good attack, while Flamethrower can better hit physically-defensive Steels. Dragon Tail serves the same purpose as it does on the previous set, but can't take advantage of Choice Scarf, so Knock Off could be a better option if you already have something else on your team that can phase or can use Haze or Clear Smog to ruin setups. With the Scarf, this set should outrun anything with base Speed 106 and under, not considering the opposing pokemon being Scarfed or with a priority move, so that's something to consider when running this set.
 

Machomacho

Well-Known Member
In the competitive metagame, the combination of a Sleep move and Dream Eater isn't a very reliable strategy at all. This is especially true for Whimsicott, since it's stuck with using Grass Whistle, which I believe is the least accurate Sleep move, next to Sing. It's only 55% accurate, and even with Wide Lens this is only boosted to 60.5%, which I think is less than Hypnosis. Whimsicott doesn't have the bulk to just be sitting there blowing whistles all day, fishing for Sleep. Grass Whistle and Sing do have two major benefits over the more accurate Sleep Powder and Spore; they are sound moves, meaning they should be able to go through a Substitute, and they aren't powder moves, meaning they can affect Grass types and pokemon with Overcoat or Safety Goggles. This strategy might work IF Whimicott had access to, say, Infestation, or was in a Doubles team with Gothitelle or Dugtrio, but otherwise, it's best to shy away from this strategy, as there's FAR more useful ways to use a Whimsicott:

Whimsicott @ Leftovers
Prankster
Timid
248 HP, 252 Speed, 8 SpAtt
- Substitute
- Leech Seed
- Moonblast/Giga Drain/Energy Ball/Stun Spore
- Encore/Stun Spore

While it doesn't have great bulk, Whimsicott can be a really annoying pokemon to face off against due to Prankster and SubSeed strategy. The Substitute works well as a scouting move; if the opponent uses an attack that breaks it you can switch out, or if they use status or setup you can lock them into it with Encore or paralyze them with Stun Spore to cripple them. If you end up facing something Whimsicott can handle, Leech Seed and proceed to rock the opponent's world. If you really want you could eschew an attacking move to have both Encore and Stun Spore, but it's probably a good idea to instead keep an attack on hand in the event the opponent opens with Taunt; Moonblast is probably the best all-around, but Giga Drain and Energy Ball are also viable.

Whimsicott @ Choice Specs
Infiltrator
Timid
4 HP, 252 SpAtt, 252 Speed
- Moonblast
- Energy Ball
- Hurricane/Shadow Ball
- Switcheroo/Hidden Power [Rock]

Whimsicott isn't the greatest offensive presence either with only 77 base SpAtt, but if you get rid of the right threats it can still crush some souls. With this set we go for Infiltrator to keep the opponent from defending themselves with a Substitute and Choice Specs to maximize Whimsicott's offensive strength. Moonblast and Energy Ball are the obvious STABs here, and Switcheroo is great for locking down defensive pokemon or trapping physically offensive pokemon into a predicted setup move. The real question here is your coverage move. While Psychic is an option, I'd avid it since you already handle Fighting types with Moonblast and you would probably want to get rid of Poison types well ahead of time. Hurricane is the stronger option power-wise, but suffers from lower accuracy; Shadow Ball is weaker, but has 100% accuracy and much better synergy with the other types, only leaving Pyroar able to resist everything you do. I included HP Rock as an additional coverage move over Switcheroo, but chances are if you're going this route, you'd be better off with Mismagius, which gets access to a stronger special Rock move and has considerably better SpAtt to boot. In fact it also gets Trick, meaning the only thing that makes this particular set superior is dealing slightly better damage with Moonblast and Energy Ball and access to Infiltrator. It is absolutely an option to consider, though.

So then a set for Togekiss like this wouldn't do me any good
-Protect
-Yawn
-Dream Eater
-Fire Blast

I'm trying to come up with different strategies to kind of test the pool. I guess I can see that when I'm using the set it wouldn't be that great...
 

Onyx Tanuki

Ma! There's a weird 'nuki in the yahd!
So then a set for Togekiss like this wouldn't do me any good
-Protect
-Yawn
-Dream Eater
-Fire Blast

I'm trying to come up with different strategies to kind of test the pool. I guess I can see that when I'm using the set it wouldn't be that great...

I would say no. Especially since you're not going to be guaranteeing Sleep at all with Yawn. I'm not sure about other formats but I know there's Sleep clause for Pokemon Showdown, so someone could easily switch into a pokemon of theirs that isn't necessarily needed as Sleep fodder. Even without Sleep clause, pokemon with Guts will likely have Toxic or Flame Orb, preventing the Sleep from hitting since you can only have one major status ailment at a time. And there's also Milotic and Dragonair, which benefit from Sleep via Marvel Scale and can utilize Sleep Talk sets. I'm not saying it's a completely horrible strategy, but it's easily worked around to the point that you really shouldn't rely on it for competitive play. Really the only situation I'd suggest it for would be in Doubles matches where you can pair the pokemon with the Sleep move with Gothitelle, Mega Gengar, or Dugtrio to keep the opponent from switching, or maybe on Mega Gengar itself, since that's the only thing with Arena Trap/Shadow Tag that gets a sleep move (Hypnosis to be specific). For Togekiss, you'd be much better off having it as a Paraflincher or just a general bulky sweeper.
 

Black Murder Heavangelon

Ow! Ow! Harder! Ow!
Pyroar@Shell Bell/Leftovers
Ability: Rivalry
EVs: Undecided, ideally max HP
Nature: Timid or Modest
- Entrainment
- Noble Roar
- Hyper Voice
- Fire Blast/Flamethrower

I need some help with this set.

First off, I know. Pyroar wasn't blessed with the best of stats (not even a decent movepool gamefreak wtf) but I did want to try to see how to put Noble Roar, a move unique to the Pyroar line, to work.

Noble Roar lowers the opponent's Atk and Sp.Atk by 1 stage, meaning you'd expect Pyroar to be a defensive pokemon. Unfortunately, that isn't the case, but it does have something to assist it further, and that's Entrainment. By passing the ability onto an opponent of the same gender, Rivalry will cause the opponent to have their Atk and Sp.Atk lowered by 25%. In all other cases, Pyroar will be using Rivalry to boost its own Sp.Atk, letting Pyroar play an offensive attacker one on end, and a tank on the other. For this reason, its preferred item is Shell Bell, although Leftovers is just as viable. See, Shell Bell is the item of choice for the fact that, even with Leftovers, Pyroar won't be able to wall certain pokemon this way (ie Tyranitar, Talonflame, Azumarill needs to have taken a Noble Roar drop and Rivalry's stat reducing effect is in play) so instead of letting Pyroar sit there and drool, it should be swapped out.

Now, it may be a lost cause, but I am interested in hearing the opinions of everyone here. Pokemon Showdown's calculator doesn't factor in Rivalry boosts or drops, so having the actual numbers is a bit hard to come by. And I'm aware the Entrainment strat will only work half the time due to gender ratio, but the idea was that Pyroar could punch holes and wall at the drop of a hat this way.

I might bring in some calcs later to try and prove Pyroar can do things. Doubt it, though.

No Lave Plume or Inferno makes defensive Pyroar very sad

EDIT: It's not working out. Ironically, a straight up defensive Pyroar works loads better than I thought.

Pyroar@Leftovers
Ability: Rivalry
EVs: 252 HP/252 Def/4 Sp.Def
Nature: Bold
-Entrainment
-Noble Roar
-Will-o-wisp
-Snarl/Fire Spin

It still uses the Entrainment strat from the above set, but it uses the move defensively, not offensively. Removing an ability like Huge Power and Guts allows Pyroar to wall endlessly, even with a weak as hell 72 Def stat. Noble Roar scores an Atk and Sp.Atk drop and is safe against mixed attackers, while Will-o-wisp cripples physical attackers even harder. Guts pokemon are not to be feared thanks to Entrainment. And Snarl is an offensive attack that can bypass Taunt and weakens special attackers should they come about. Since this set is less effective against physical attackers, Fire Spin is another viable option to trap opponents once they realize they're not hurting Pyroar.

I have calcs.

164 Atk Choice Band Azumarill Waterfall vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Pyroar: 168-200 (44.6 - 53.1%) -- 0.4% chance to 2HKO after Leftovers recovery
These are the calcs simulating the effect of a Rivalry stat reduction induced by Entrainment, lowering Azumarill's Atk to 175 from 218. EVs, IVs, and Base stats were fiddled with to get this result.

And these are the calcs of Entrainment passing along a Rivalry Boost.
212+ Atk Choice Band Azumarill Waterfall vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Pyroar: 264-312 (70.2 - 82.9%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery
Azumarill ain't such hot Grimer without its precious Huge Power boost (it doesn't OHKO but that does a lot of damage shh)

In the event that Entrainment gives the opponent an Atk boost, Will-o-wisp is a much better idea.

252+ Atk Choice Band Huge Power burned Azumarill Waterfall vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Pyroar: 211-249 (56.1 - 66.2%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery

Entrainment Rivalry works best when the genders are opposite, and if the opponent has an attack boosting ability. If they are the same, Will-o-wisp works better for surviving the initial hit.

0 Atk Garchomp Earthquake vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Pyroar: 234-276 (62.2 - 73.4%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery (Rivalry drop)

252 Atk burned Garchomp Earthquake vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Pyroar: 144-171 (38.2 - 45.4%) -- guaranteed 3HKO after Leftovers recovery

Now, here's a fun one. Standard Conkeldurr doesn't OHKO with Drain Punch.

252+ Atk Conkeldurr Drain Punch vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Pyroar: 254-300 (67.5 - 79.7%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery

Let's use Entrainment, and let's say it's the opposite sex.

0+ Atk Conkeldurr Drain Punch vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Pyroar: 204-240 (54.2 - 63.8%) -- guaranteed 2HKO after Leftovers recovery (IVs lowered to simulate Rivalry drop)

Still a 2HKO, but now that it doesn't have Guts, let's Burn it.

0+ Atk burned Conkeldurr Drain Punch vs. 252 HP / 252+ Def Pyroar: 102-120 (27.1 - 31.9%) -- 38.3% chance to 4HKO after Leftovers recovery

Of course, Pyroar would be dead by now, but this is an extreme case. Of, Entrainment and Burns, I mean.

This works far more ideally in a team that takes advantage of gender. Even if Pyroar goes down, if it passed along Rivalry, the teammate coming in can benefit by sharing the gender of Pyroar, and keeping the opponent crippled with Rivalry and not whatever ability they had. Something like Shadow Tag Gothitelle can be a real pain because now it can set up and can't be stopped. But this is hyperbole.

Actually, this whole post is hyperbole.

...

Sorry for going overboard with the calcs and stuff. I really wanted to make Pyroar work. :'<

Still though, interesting stuff ;D
 
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