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The Serebii Reviewing Team - Not the same as last time

Discussion in 'Other Video Game Discussion' started by Kabutopzilla, Jun 16, 2009.

  1. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    Approved by JoshYEAH.

    First off, this team has NO affiliation with Night Shadow and Viva La Vida's reviewing team, so no worries about that. This time, it's just me running it, with the help of the rest of you. The organization is simple and lenient: review a game, post it here. I take the link to that post and put it here, in this first post.

    You won't be assigned a game to review, as that raises the issue of you possibly not having the game in your possession. Just review a game and post the review. You won't be assigned to one or two consoles and be committed to just those two; review any game for any console.

    Just please, tell me which console on which the game you are reviewing has been played by you on. That would help organization.

    Also leave your username and the date the review was posted on the review, and put in parentheses the game's ESRB rating after bracketing your number rating.

    You don't have to review. You can also post to comment or give feedback/contructive criticism to reviews if you'd like. But keep in mind that any criticism MUST be constructive, and that all comments must contribute to the thread in some way (which can be a reply to someone else's comment).

    Reviews posted both in here and in the "Official Game Rating Thread" will be posted up here.

    The rating scale is 1-10, but you can dig deeper into a number with the decimal system if you like. Just don't do more than one digit past the decimal if there is one in the rating.

    1.0-1.9: Abysmal. A rating like this means the game reviewed is horrendous in every way possible and should not be touched or even thought about being played.

    2.0-2.9: Terrible. The game is ultimately terrible and should not be played. If there are any redeeming factors to the game, the cons outweigh the pros any way you look at it.

    3.0-3.9: Bad. A game with this rating is unplayable and should not be bought. There may be some qualities in the game that prevent it from being rated lower, but, again, the cons outweigh the pros.

    4.0-4.9: Poor. The game is unplayable but may have its extremely rare shining moments. Still, this rating implies that the title should not be bought nor rented.

    5.0-5.9: Mediocre. The cons still outweigh the pros, but just by a wee bit. Some parts of the game may be moderately enjoyable, but the rating implies that if anything, the game should be rented but not bought.

    6.0-6.9: Decent. The game is decent and likely has quite a few moments to stand out and shine, and may be a fun game. If you like the game's genre more than any other, chances are you'll find the game enjoyable and fun. But if you're not as much of a fan of the genre, it's best to steer clear.

    7.0-7.9: Average. The game is average. Nothing really new is introduced in the formula, but the game still passes to be nicely executed and generally enjoyable game even if you are not much of a fan of the genre. This rating implies that you should rent the game first to see if you like it.

    8.0-8.9: Great. Those who are not a fan of the game's genre will still find something nice about the game. The game is great, and if you generally like its genre, it is likely best to buy the game. The game probably introduces some new things never seen before, despite their execution being slightly off.

    9.0-9.9: Wonderful. The game is enjoyable for mostly everyone, and exceeds expectations in most ways, though it may fail in a certain key aspect to enjoyment, albeit very slightly.

    10: Perfect. The game is perfect in nearly every way, with any fault, provided there is any noticable (but there is always some), being forgivable. Even for those who only mildly enjoy the genre must address this game as a must-buy.

    But also keep in mind that every rating and review is the reviewer's personal opinion about the game, so their rating may not suit your tastes.

    There is no form for reviews, so express yourself with your own reviewing style. BUT. There are a mere few requirements.

    • Each and every review must contain a minimum of 150 words, and that's for the BODY of the review. Your username and the date do NOT count here.
    • Do not flame someone else's ratings.
    • Do not praise the game at the expense of another. Comparisons are fine, but there is such a thing as "overkill". This goes for hating on a game as well.
    • Don't rate a game big "just because". Give reasons why you liked the game and also explain the faults of the game. Even perfect games have faults, so don't use that as an excuse.

    Also, despite my lenience, do please keep in mind that I would appreciate for you to update semi-frequently at least. Thanks.

    One more thing, I dunno if I need to have a mod authorize this or not, but do please feel free to multi-post if you have many reviews you wish to contribute. This is so you can post reviews despite possible inactivity, while at the same time, I can separate the reviews based on separate posts.

    Hope that's alright with you staff. Please forgive me if it's not...

    Also, if someone already reviewed the game you want to review, don't worry about it. Review the game anyway; that's why I require a username in your post. Everyone has their different opinions.

    Yyyyeah, I think that just about covers it. I am going to list the consoles organized in generations and being handheld and PC, sans the current generation. The reviews will be put under their respective generation/console. I will update this list as I go.

    The games will be listed in alphabetical order under each separate category.

    Oh, by the way, NR means "Not Rated by the ESRB". Things like NR--E or such mean that the game was not originally rated by the ESRB, but they recently were due to a re-release or a port or something of that sort.

    [EDIT]Suggested by BlitzBlast.

    Alright, for the whole "Review Request" thing, I've somewhat drawn up a "how-to".

    First, people PM or VM (or post in a seperate thread if needed) you (or someone you choose) NES games to you.

    Then you (or the person you chose) will then pick a certain amount of these games and send them to people who have decided to take requests (as of now only me, but hopefully others will join).

    You can have one person play one game (like how reviews are done right now), or three people play one game (Like EGM); that can probably be discussed later.

    Anyway, if the game's ROM can be found, the reviewer will play the game for either:

    A) Thirty minutes, before giving a review.

    B) Beat the game, and then give a review.

    While B) would give better reviews, it could possibly slow everything down, while A) can give a constant amount of reviews.

    Of course, there could be an option to do A) or B) as I described in my earlier PM, where if the reviewer likes the game enough they can review it after there time limit is done, then beat the game and edit their original review.[/EDIT]

    First--Fifth Generation Console Reviews (Various; please specify)

    Castlevania: Symphony of the Night - Yonowaru in Chaos - August 6th, 2009 - [No Rating Given] (T) - PlayStation
    Deadly Towers - BlitzBlast - August 8th, 2009 - [1/10] (NR) - Nintendo Entertainment System
    Kirby's Dreamland - Glass Eye - June 30th, 2009 - [8.7/10] (E) - Super Nintendo Entertainment System
    Mega Man 6 - BlitzBlast - July 31st, 2009 - [7.5/10] (NR--E) - Nintendo Entertainment System
    Mega Man X - BlitzBlast - July 3rd, 2009 - [10/10] (NR--E) - Super Nintendo Entertainment System
    Mega Man X2 - BlitzBlast - July 3rd, 2009 - [6.6/10] (E) - Super Nintendo Entertainment System
    Mega Man X3 - BlitzBlast - July 3rd, 2009 - [7.6/10] (E) - PlayStation
    Mega Man X4 - BlitzBlast - July 2nd, 2009 - [8.3/10] (E) - PlayStation
    Mega Man X5 - BlitzBlast - July 1st, 2009 - [7.2/10] (E) - PlayStation
    Mega Man X6 - BlitzBlast - June 30th, 2009 - [4.2/10] (E) - PlayStation
    Metroid - Kabutopzilla - June 20th, 2009 - [8/10] (NR--E) - Nintendo Entertainment System
    Super Metroid - Kabutopzilla - June 15th, 2009 - [10/10] (E) - Super Nintendo Entertainment System

    Sixth Generation Console Reviews (PlayStation 2, GameCube, Xbox, DreamCast)

    Destroy All Humans! - Overheat Hothead - June 17th, 2009 - [8.8/10] (T) - PS2
    Halo: Combat Evolved - Kabutopzilla - June 17th, 2009 - [9.8/10] (M) - Xbox
    Halo 2 - Kabutopzilla - June 28th, 2009 - [8.4/10] (M) - Xbox
    Katamari Damacy - Overheat Hothead - June 17th, 2009 - [8/10] (E) - PS2
    Psychonauts - Zero Nexus - August 6th, 2009 - [10/10] (T) - Xbox/PlayStation 2
    Mega Man X Collection - BlitzBlast - July 4th, 2009 - [7.6/10] (E) - GameCube
    Metroid Prime - Kabutopzilla - June 16th, 2009 - [10/10] (T) - GameCube
    Metroid Prime 2: Echoes - Kabutopzilla - June 16th, 2009 - [9/10] (T) - GameCube
    Ratchet & Clank - Overheat Hothead - July 8th, 2009 - [7.8/10] (T) - PlayStation 2
    Shin Megami Tensei: Persona 4 - Glass Eye - July 8th, 2009 - [9.8/10] (M) - PlayStation 2

    PlayStation 3 Reviews

    Wii Reviews

    Final Fantasy IV: The After Years - Krake - July 28th, 2009 - [8.5/10] (T) - WiiWare
    Guitar Hero: Metallica - Night Shadow - June 17th, 2009 - [8.5/10] (T)
    Guitar Hero: Smash Hits - Night Shadow - June 18th, 2009 - [8.8/10] (T)
    King of Fighters: The Orochi Saga - Glass Eye - June 16th, 2009 - [7.4/10] (T)
    MadWorld - Night Shadow - June 20th, 2009 - [9.1/10] (M)
    Mario Super Sluggers - The Dean of Suds - June 20th, 2009 - [7/10] (E)
    Metroid Prime 3: Corruption - Kabutopzilla - June 16th, 2009 - [8/10] (T)
    Samurai Showdown Anthology - Glass Eye - June 23rd, 2009 - [7.8/10] (T)
    Super Smash Bros. Brawl - BlitzBlast - July 21st, 2009 - [9.5/10] (T)
    The Conduit - Night Shadow - June 29th, 2009 - [8.1/10] (T)
    The Conduit - Viva la Vida - June 29th, 2009 - [9/10] (T)
    The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess - Kabutopzilla - June 24th, 2009 - [9.3/10] (T)

    Xbox 360 Reviews

    BioShock - Kabutopzilla - June 15th, 2009 - [9.6/10] (M)
    CellFactor: Psychokinetic Wars - Kabutopzilla - June 22nd, 2009 - [9.3/10] (T) - Xbox LIVE Arcade
    Dead Space - Kabutopzilla - June 27th, 2009 - [9.9/10] (M)
    Gears of War - Kabutopzilla - June 16th, 2009 - [9.7/10] (M)
    Gears of War 2 - Kabutopzilla - June 15th, 2009 - [9.9/10] (M)
    Ghost Busters: The Video Game - Gentleman Skeleton - June 18th, 2009 - [8.5/10] (T)
    Halo 3 - Kabutopzilla - June 16th, 2009 - [8.7/10] (M)

    Handheld Game Reviews

    Final Fantasy III - BlitzBlast - July 13th, 2009 - [4.5/10] (E10+) - Nintendo DS
    Fire Emblem 7 - electricwolf - July 5th, 2009 - [9.4/10] (E) - GameBoy Advance
    Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade - BlitzBlast - July 5th, 2009 - [8.6/10] (E) - GameBoy Advance
    Guitar Hero: On Tour - Kabutopzilla - June 18th, 2009 - [4/10] (E10+) - Nintendo DS
    Kirby Super Star Ultra - Kabutopzilla - June 18th, 2009 - [9/10] (E) - Nintendo DS
    New Super Mario Bros. - Overheat Hothead - June 17th, 2009 - [7.5/10] (E) - DS
    Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga - Sonic Boom - June 17th, 2009 - [9/10] (E) - GameBoy Advance
    Metroid Fusion - Kabutopzilla - June 18th, 2009 - [9/10] (E) - GameBoy Advance
    Metroid II: Return of Samus - Kabutopzilla - June 18th, 2009 - [7.5/10] (NR) - GameBoy
    Metroid Prime Hunters - Kabutopzilla - June 18th, 2009 - [8/10] (T) - Nintendo DS
    Metroid Prime Hunters - Night Shadow - June 18th, 2009 - [9.6/10] (T) - Nintendo DS
    Metroid: Zero Mission - Kabutopzilla - June 18th, 2009 - [10/10] (E) - GameBoy Advance
    Pokemon Crystal - electricwolf - July 5th, 2009 - [10/10] (E) - GameBoy Color
    Pokemon Diamond/Pearl - Kabutopzilla - June 17th, 2009 - [7/10] (E) - Nintendo DS
    Pokemon Gold/Silver - Kabutopzilla - June 17th, 2009 - [9.7/10] (E) - GameBoy Color
    Shin Megami Tensei: Devil Survivor - Glass Eye - August 6th, 2009 - [8.7/10] (T) - Nintendo DS
    The World Ends With You - Viva la Vida - July 2nd, 2009 - [10/10] (T) - Nintendo DS

    PC/Mac Reviews

    Chzo Mythos - The Doctor - June 18th, 2009 - Yeah, it's pretty good (NR) - PC
    Mega Man X7 - BlitzBlast - July 8th, 2009 - [2.3/10] (E) - PC
    Mega Man X8 - BlitzBlast - July 10th, 2009 - [9.6/10] (E) - PC
    Spore - Kabutopzilla - June 16th, 2009 - [9.8/10] (E10+) - PC
    Team Fortress 2 - Divine. - June 19th, 2009 - [9/10] (M) - PC

    Web Game Reviews

    Maplestory - BlitzBlast - July 4th, 2009 - [2.6/10] (NR)
    MechQuest - electricwolf - July 4th, 2009 - [9.1/10] (NR)
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2009
  2. pokefan

    pokefan Well-Known Member

    sweet , i'll review some later when i'm not feeling lazy
     
  3. Zazie

    Zazie So 1991

  4. Slick

    Slick Banned

  5. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    Gears of War

    Note: This is weird...I played the original after I've played the sequel to the bones. But anyhow, I can see why people love this game, of those people including myself.

    In this review, I am going to compare the original to the sequel, not the other way around. This is because I have never touched the original, and simply grabbed the sequel immediately up until now. Neh.

    -----
    Story
    -----

    Much, much better than its successor. The story in the series's debut does not rely on being character-driven, unlike the sequel, and actually has some substance to the plot. The concept is still as simple as ABC123, but the plot is the backbone to the concept. And it's a strong backbone. Story: 9.5/10

    -----
    Graphics
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    There seem to be a few more glitches in the original visual-wise, but nothing really all too noticable. The graphics were revolutionary, while still looking a tad rubbery, they helped show that we were easily about to perfect our graphical development abilities. Note that this game was released in late 2006! That's pretty impressive. Graphics: 9.5/10

    -----
    Gameplay
    -----

    In comparison to Gears of War 2, the original seems balanced. The sequel took things from the original and made some things worse in certain departments, and other things better. Things that should have remained the same in transition to the sequel is the solid vehicular controls; they are actually not all too frustrating. There are fewer vehicle moments, and they are all actually fun to play and accessible.
    Things that were better off being improved on include the on-the-ground mechanic. In the original, if you fell down, you were down. No crawling to safety, none of that. You can't crawl in this game. And unlike the campaign in Gears of War 2, the other, unplayable characters can't rescue you. So if you're playing co-op and Dom/Marcus is out of reach (such as in a split-up exploration objective) you will be forced to reload the last checkpoint and try a new strategy.
    Bosses in this game are more frequent, and enemies I've never seen before made me wonder why they never popped up in the sequel. I knew RAAM wouldn't have; but what about Berserkers? Did they go extinct? The Berserker segments are fun. Corpsers appear scarcely with one showing up as a boss at some point in the game, whereas they were more frequent in the sequel and were used more as annoying enemies that stood in your way. One Brumak shows its face once, and that's it; you don't even fight it. I was beginning to wonder if Reavers were new to Gears of War until the few showed up at the very end just before you fight the Locust's military leader. Wretches are more used in this game, particularly the lambent Wretches. Drones are as frequently appearing as always, and, as expected, no Skorge means no Kantus.
    The level design is far more impressive than the game's successor, especially the very ending chapter, where you're on a fast train (that which sports epic music) and when you're navigating Jacinto (?) at night, with a mysterious bat species called Kryll attacking you whenever you touch anything not graced with light.
    As for difficulty: you flippin' kidding me? I played through on Casual to save me the frustration and to speed up the reviewing process, and I had a tough time trudging through the game. This game, even on Casual difficulty, really forces you to utilize the cover mechanic to its fullest extent, something that was loosened up in the sequel. Enemies do not die as fast, and you die faster. It's like you're playing Hardcore in Gears of War 2 when you play on Casual!
    With that said, the game is significantly shorter than the sequel, but I'll get to that later. Gameplay: 10/10

    -----
    Sound
    -----

    As expected, the musical score for the game is magnificent; especially a track for when you're at the end of the last act of the campaign. It's very action-y and exciting, and appealing to heavy rock/metal fans. The sound effects are great, but some are absent. I can't tell when I headshot a drone anymore. But hey, that's forgivable, as the voice performances in this game far surpass the sequel's. Delta Squad in itself is made up of comedians that provide dry comic relief. Baird shows his disgust toward Marcus very well, and is the funniest of the crew with his sarcastic sense of humor and being able to turn a vulgar phrase you could hear at any time and let it slide into a friggin' hilarious quote. But you can credit the voice actor for that. When the whole team is just talking around about some pointless things, you will find yourself giggling and at times bursting out into laughter. What's funny is, most of the time they are being serious simultaneously to their jokes. Sound: 9.5/10

    -----
    Length/Replay Value
    -----

    The length of the campaign is quite a bit shorter than Gears of War 2's, but that's forgivable with the Insane-on-Casual difficulty Gears of War 2 got rid of. The replay value for the campaign is actually decent, almost being as replayable as that of the Halo series. Length/Replay Value: 9/10

    -----
    Fun Factor
    -----

    I haven't gotten a taste of the multiplayer for this game quite yet, but I'm certain that it is just as magnificent as the sequel's. As for the campaign, it is undeniably fun and will keep bringing you back to it. Fun Factor: 9.8/10

    Overall: 9.7/10, superb. This game is wonderful, and is a must-buy if you enjoy shooters. Just don't make the same mistake I did; pick up the original first. Target has it cheap in its bargain bin, and GameStop would have a copy at even cheaper with the fact that it is used.
     
  6. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    METROID PRIME

    Metroid Prime is quite easily among the best games ever created, sitting up there with the instant classic Metroid: Zero Mission and the masterpiece that brought the series to recognition, Super Metroid. After many skeptical fans were cautious with the game, it immediately became a hit, known for being one of the finest transitions from 2D to 3D that any series has ever made.

    -----
    Story
    -----

    Who needs one? The game does boast a story, however. At first glance, it may not be much at all, but dissecting the story of the game to the bone actually shows that Retro Studios is not so good at telling stories, so much as forcing the player to figure the whole thing out for theirself if they so choose to. This is a nice, original touch. The game introduces the Scan Visor, which you can use to scan the anatomy of creatures as well as learn Chozo Lore and Space Pirate Data entries. If you don't scan these, you're missing out on how you figure the entire story out. If you scan nothing, you will not understand where anything came from, how anything happened, nothing. But if you scan everything you can as the chance arises, then you would understand how the Metroid Prime came to be, how Ridley came back as a mechanical cyborg, where creatures like Flaahgra and Thardus came from, etcetera. As for its place on the timeline, the Prime series takes off a few months after the events of the original Metroid/Zero Mission. Story: 10/10

    -----
    Graphics
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    Another thing Retro Studios can be known for is their remarkable ability to push the graphical ability of games to the limit, and I mean that in every sense. In comparison to Metroid Prime, games like Halo: Combat Evolved and such do not live up to Prime's graphical qualities. This is absolutely astounding for a GameCube game when the GameCube is a third of the way through its life span. Games on the GCN released around the same time as Metroid Prime may never beat it graphic-wise. With that said, there are some parts of the visuals that do look as though they would be on a GCN game, but that's forgivable. Graphics: 10/10

    -----
    Gameplay
    -----

    Story is good. Check. Graphics are wonderful. Check. Now gameplay? Hm...
    Just kidding! Prime whoops ass when it comes to gameplay. The gameplay is mostly what made this game so great. Retro did an amazing job with it, making Prime one of the best dimensional transitions a series could ever make. Through and through, Prime feels like a Metroid game. The environments feel practically nostalgiac, even the newer ones that which did not share a similar environment with Super Metroid. There is that wondeful sense of freedom present. As for sequence breaking, Retro doesn't want you doing it. And so they should; despite the freedom given, it is greatly difficult to sequence break this game, requiring you to screw with the game's mechanics and in some cases forcing you to utilize "secret worlds" which are glitchy environments found beyond the walls Retro put up for you to stick to.
    But even without sequence breaking, Metroid Prime is still a must-have. The level design is wonderful and as said, nostalgiac. You will explore things ranging from an abandoned Chozo settlement to a frozen shoreline to a lava cavern in the depths of the planet to a deadly Space Pirate stronghold in some mines used for digging up Phazon, which will later become Metroid Prime's defining element. But those are not all that you will explore.
    The difficulty is just right, but may be harder for someone who isn't necessarily a hardcore gamer. You won't feel overwhelmed nor underwhelmed, with a few tedious parts throughout such as trudging through the Phazon Mines or fighting Thardus, the most evil boss in the game.
    Ridley makes a pleasant return, first being seen near the beginning as you flee from the Space Pirate Frigate that brought you into this whole mess. Throughout the game, you see him at certain points, leading up to you fighting him near the end as the next-to-last boss. But he's not just Ridley this time, he's META Ridley. Beast.
    As for controls, the game nails it here as well. Perhaps not nearly as good as Prime 3's controls, but hey, whaddya think the New Play Control titles are for? The controls flow well, and do not require a steep learning curve to get a hold of. Once you're through the Space Pirate Frigate, I think you'll have it down.
    Now for bosses. Retro outdoes themself again, bringing us wonderful new bosses with excellently creative designs and wonderful strategies for us to administer in order to ensure victory in favor of our favorite bounty hunter heroine. The bosses range from a wasp-guarded totem to a malfunctioning fire-spitting drone used for unknown reasons to a large bundle of rocks held together by Phazon. Damn.
    Items. The game introduces its fair share of items to Samus's arsenal, but also brings back some old, non-organic friends. New items include the Boost Ball (supposedly a 3D version of the Speed Booster), the Phazon Suit, the Thermal Visor, the X-Ray Visor, the Scan Visor, and more. Returning items include the Varia Suit, Gravity Suit, Wave Beam, Ice Beam, and Plasma Beam, as well as long-lost items such as the Spider Ball. Gameplay: 10/10

    -----
    Sound
    -----

    Retro outdoes themself AGAIN. This time with sound. The music is wonderful, memorable, and even nostalgiac. Some old tracks are the Lower Norfair score transferred into the Magmoor Caverns, the first Tallon Overworld track which is a chorusing, slower version of the Metroid series's signature Brinstar theme, and Ridley's theme which is remixed as hell but still brilliant. New tracks include Phendrana Drifts, which even despite that it's new will move you and bring back some memories. The sound effects are brilliant, far more realistic than the 2D games. Kudos again again again, Retro. Sound: 10/10

    -----
    Length/Replay Value
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    The game has a nice length. You can't beat it in a sitting, unless you have trained yourself to master the arts of sequence breaking and speed-running. It's satisfyingly lengthy. Due to it being substantially longer than the 2D Metroid titles, Metroid Prime simply lacks the replay value that Super Metroid, the later Zero Mission, and even Metroid Fusion share and hold so dearly. But that is entirely forgivable. Length/Replay Value: 9/10

    -----
    Fun Factor
    -----

    Do you like shooters? Do you like Metroid? Do you like adventure? Do you like Sci-Fi? Do you like semi-genuine horror? Do you like the freedom to explore? If you answered "yes" to AT LEAST ONE of those questions, then you will find Metroid Prime an undeniably fun game. Fun Factor: 10/10

    Overall: 10/10, perfect. Despite that I have so far given two other games an overall rating of 10, know that I don't hand out 10's like candy. I just seem to rate games that easily deserve a perfect 10. :D

    Metroid: Zero Mission may have been rated 10 by my pure squeeing fanboyism toward the Metroid series, but that isn't the case here. This was my first Metroid game (despite that this wasn't the Metroid title that got me into the series) and I found it an amazing game in general, let alone an amazing Metroid game. If you enjoy the genre (and/or silently responded "yes" to any of the questions I asked at the beginning of the Fun Factor section of this review) pick up this game NOW if you have not already done so. No questions!

    Ultimate Ridley out.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2009
  7. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    METROID PRIME 2: ECHOES

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    Story
    -----

    Metroid Prime 2: Echoes's story is more or less interesting. It is somewhere between deep for a Metroid title and just as shallow as a Metroid title's story should be. This time around, Samus crashlands on a mysterious planet called Aether, leaving a decent explanation for why Samus can't simply leave because she wants to. As for the whole connection to the entire Metroid series's storyline, there is barely any besides to introduce the entity that is Dark Samus and to further prove the dangers of the deadly toxin introduced in the original Prime game as Phazon. Echoes's story revolves around a philosophical race known as the Luminoth. These peaceful creatures recently endured a war and seemingly lost to their enemies, known as the Ing, until the sole survivor, U-Mos, appoints Samus to finish the Ing off for good and bring peace back to Light Aether. See, a meteor, later proven to be a Leviathan Seed, awkwardly crashes into Aether, splitting it into two separate dimensions, respectively called Light Aether and Dark Aether. It doesn't take Samus long to realize that if she does not fulfill U-Mos's request, Light Aether will be destroyed, and then the Ing will terrorize other planets, including those such as Daiban. Light Aether is as normal as any Metroid environment, but Dark Aether can prove to be hell, as the atmosphere literally corrodes your armor---at first. Story: 8.5/10

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    Graphics
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    Okay, these graphics are abso-freaking-lutely AMAZING for a GameCube game. They are almost beyond Xbox-level in terms of shininess and what not---they definitely surpass games like Halo: Combat Evolved in terms of graphics. They certainly kick the crap out of the original Prime game's graphics. The animations are, as expected, wonderful. The only issue many people including myself have with the graphics is the assortment of colors. There isn't much variety at all in either world, but especially in Dark Aether. But graphics are most definitely not all that matter in a game, are they? Graphics: 10/10, for its time.

    -----
    Gameplay
    -----

    This game is, by all means, NOT for the casual gamer. Why? Well, first off, it's hard as hell. Boss after boss sans a few are ridiculous in difficulty or time wasted trying to beat them, or both. For example, the Boost Guardian. One of the three most annoying bosses in the whole game. You fight it in Dark Aether with NO safe zones, so your health is slowly corroding away every second of the battle. Albeit, unless you sequence broke the game, you should have the Dark Suit by then which makes the corrosion rate significantly lower than before, but this fight is still hell. I won't go into details, as this isn't a boss guide. But I will tell you this: the game is satisfyingly difficult for the most part, with some ridiculously tough areas to trudge through.
    As for bosses, as said, most are difficult, some take too long, some are pushovers, and some are pretty damn epic. I'm eyeing Quadraxis with that remark; Quaddy is quite simply the best Metroid boss in any Metroid game if not among the best bosses in video gaming history.
    The game plays pretty much the same as the original Prime, with a satisfying number of new upgrades including beams, visors, suits, etc. Gravity Boost, for example, is the equivalent of the original Prime's Gravity Suit, however, it also allows Samus to jump three times underwater with the third time open for being a very long thrust upward. This upgrade is practically useless anywhere else besides the hydro-station section of Torvus Bog, but it is still very fun to use. An upgrade that was not used in the original Prime but was often obtained late in all 2D Metroid games is the---drum roll please---Screw Attack! Yep, that's right. Retro brought the Screw Attack and very nicely transferred it from a 2D item into a 3D upgrade; something thought to be impossible by many with an item such as it. Gameplay: 9.5/10

    -----
    Sound
    -----

    While much more dull when compared to the original Prime's phenominal musical score, Echoes's is still great in almost every way, particularly in areas such as some boss fights, Torvus Bog, and Sanctuary Fortress. Quadraxis's theme is the meaning of epic, and the Emperor Ing's themes are very fit for the mood that is attempted to be set by Retro. The sound effects are everything you'd expect for a 3D game. Sound: 9/10

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    Length/Replay Value
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    This game is considered to be very long--perhaps too long--for a GameCube game. It will take about two days to beat it if you play it very religiously. As for replay value, there isn't much. You aren't too likely to start a new file just because--mainly due to the fact that the game is very long and tiring at parts. Length/Replay Value: 8.5/10

    -----
    Fun Factor
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    Don't get me wrong---Echoes is by all means fun. At least, the story mode is. It has a half-baked multiplayer which is no fun. For one thing, it gives too many cheap advantages and few weapons to fend enemies with. If you're good at Unreal Tournament or Halo, that doesn't mean you'll kick *** at this multiplayer. There are few maps to play on. Ultimately, don't get Fun Factor just for the multiplayer, because you will get heavily disappointed by it. Get it for the awesome single player mode. Fun Factor: 9/10

    Overall: 9/10, superb. It doesn't beat Metroid Prime by any means, but this game is most definitely worth your money if you are interested in the genre.
     
  8. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    METROID PRIME 3: CORRUPTION

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    Story
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    After Metroid Fusion, this is another Metroid game with an inkling more of a story than just simply DISTRESS SIGNAL GO INVESTIGATE. It is the final entry in the Prime trilogy that centers around Phazon. You start at the G.F.S. Olympus in your tricked-out ship with no explanation of how your ship came around to looking like that (not that anyone'd expect there to be one). You meet Castor Dane, the Aurora Unit, and three other hunters: Rundas, the Noxus-esque ice-master, Gandrayda, the mysterious shapeshifter, and Ghor, the intelligent robot with a detachable combat mech. Apparently, a virus is going around infecting Aurora Units left and right. The Aurora Unit on the Olympus was the first AU to receive a vaccine for the mysterious pathogen. Of course, the Federation jumps to the conclusion that the virus is of Space Pirate origin. What would you expect? Ironically, shortly after, the Space Pirates attack. Who'da thunkit? After this, you travel between various planets after learning of the Leviathan Seeds, which explains the meteors crashing into Tallon IV and Aether, bringing Phazon to both planets. First, you stop a Seed from hitting Norion, a forest-y planet with a somewhat large GF base on it. Then it's your mission to go to Bryyo and destroy the already planted seed, and to investigate Rundas's mysterious disappearance. Then it all repeats until the game is over pretty much. Story: 6.7/10

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    Graphics
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    The graphics of Metroid Prime 3: Corruption easily demonstrates what the Wii is capable of in the graphics department. If you are more of a 360 fan, however, the graphics may disappoint you. But at least the graphics of Corruption partially disproves the commonly-conformed-to belief that "the Wii sucks becuz its grafix suk lolz". Graphics: 9/10

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    Gameplay
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    Alright, gameplay is precisely why even when Corruption is horrendously overrated that I still give it an eight. Fanboys of the game, don't flame me for this.
    The controls. Possibly the best damn part of the game. The controls are wonderfully put together and flow amazingly. They are very much so dazzling, though sometimes tricky (but that's mainly my sensor bar's fault).
    The controls flow well with nice enemy battles; the game has a nice mixture of cutscene-based enemy battles that later show up as random encounters, then there are random encounters.
    The level design, ultimately, sucks. The concepts for the levels mostly feel dull and used before, and a dull level design does not help that at all. A supposed exception is Elysia, which is the only planet Retro seemed to put any effort into.
    Bosses. You know, it is kind of disappointing that the hardest boss in the entire game is, like, the third boss or so. Rundas. Bosses like Mogenar may prove worthy of your ultimate frustration, but any other boss, seriously, is a disappointing pushover. The only redeeming factor is that these bosses have a unique and special design.
    Unlike Prime 2, there is no multiplayer, and truthfully, that's excellent. The Prime 2 multiplayer sucked monkey...things. Too bad there isn't much to do when you got every damned medal and bought everything in the in-game shop (where you can buy the game's soundtracks and such to listen to whenever your heart desires). Gameplay: 9/10

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    Sound
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    The Prime games soundtracks were somewhat known for having some chorusing men and women play as the highlight of the song; mostly tracks associated with the Chozo or Luminoth, however. Prime 3 has nearly ALL of its tracks relying on that "instrument". Now, I set that up sounding like it's a bad thing. It isn't. It actually flows kind of nice with the game's environments, despite that it doesn't truthfully say much. Other tracks are blatant rip-offs from mostly the original Prime (Meta-Ridley theme, anyone?) but apparently a few are present from Echoes. The sound effects are always impressive; nothing to comment on here. Kudos, Retro. As for voice acting (yes, believe it or not, this game has VOICE ACTING), it is mostly fine, but sometimes for any character and always for some characters (*coughCastorDanecough*) the voice acting sounds a little too...tried. You know what I mean? Like they try too hard. Sound: 8.5/10

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    Length/Replay Value
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    Blame Elysia for why Corruption barely passes the almost-required 3D game campaign length. If Elysia didn't take so long, Corruption could be wiped from start to finish in less than a morning. Sad, isn't it? But that's a good thing, as Elysia WAS the best planet, after all. As for replay value, considering the game's shorter-than-its-predecessors'-length, and its undeniable fun factor, the game has plenty of replay value for a Prime game. Length/Replay Value: 8/10

    -----
    Fun Factor
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    Despite all of the horrible things I've said about this game (hopefully I didn't piss anyone off) one of the game's best qualities is that it's FUN. The gameplay is great, and the game is super-fun for its own genre, so what more could you ask for? They could've made the game 24-bit 2D graphics (thus lowering the audience's standards) and it would be a masterpiece. Fun Factor: 9.9/10

    Overall: 8/10, great. Now many of you who adore this game and claim it is the best Metroid game ever probably skipped to this part so you could pretend my opinion is flamebait and then you would PM me a load of evil cuss-outs. Let me go right ahead and spit this in your face: METROID PRIME 3 IS NNOOTT THE BEST METROID GAME EVER! Anyone who says this either has not played the other Primes or other 2D Metroids, and non-hardcore-Metroid-fans only say this because it is the most accessible Metroid game of the generation. When the Prime trilogy comes out, everyone will be like OMG METROID PRIME TRILOGY IS THE BEST METROID GAME EVER and leave poor old Corruption behind despite it would be in the damned bundle. Wait until the newly announced Metroid: Other M. Now THAT looks like a game worthy of being admired. We'll just have to wait and see, though.

    Ultimate Ridley out. With his flame shield. Booyah.
     
  9. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    Halo 3

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    Story
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    Much like the previous Halo games, Halo 3 continues the storyline by picking up where the annoying cliffhanger left us off in Halo 2. And boy, does it pick it up quite excitingly. As soon as you crash the ship, your armor is in lockdown, meaning you're pretty much frozen. But another miracle unfreezes you and you get up, prepared for battle. Apparently, you landed next to the squadron of marines with the Arbiter, who seemed to be camping out in a ridge somewhere in the rainforests of eastern Africa. Hey---as Cortana's voice said in the opening cutscene, Master Chief is one lucky duck! But anyway. It is very hard to understand what is going on at first if you didn't brush up on your Halo facts by playing and beating the first two entries in the series. If you skipped Halo: Combat Evolved, you likely won't understand why they're fighting at all. If you skipped Halo 2 but not Combat Evolved, you likely won't understand why the Arbiter and the Elites are suddenly on your side, let alone why these huge, sweaty, heavily-armored, hairy gorillas replaced their presence as enemies. And if you skipped both, then you are extremely likely to dislike the game for its confusing properties in the story department. This, however, is forgivable; given the Halo series's fanbase, it is likely you wouldn't touch this game without first having a look at the first two. And quite honestly, the story along with the campaign is the game's strongest point. Story: 9.5/10

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    Graphics
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    While most definitely not top-notch, wonderfully crafted graphics like in BioShock and Assassin's Creed, it still will satisfy that stupid discriminate teenager at your school who only cares about graphics in a game. Kudos to the game for that. Based on how simple the blood and violence was crafted, you could tell that Bungie doesn't really like to use the over-the-top gore gimmick to draw players in. Quite seriously, there isn't gore. ESRB could have rated the game "T" and could have gotten away with it, because just-blood with no gore is only enough to earn a "T" rating (as shown in games like Monster Madness: Battle for Suburbia). Albeit, there is some strong swearing in the game, but it is infrequent enough to have the stronger, M-level swears cut out, making the game only suitable for a "T" rating. But I'll get to that later...perhaps. Graphics: 8.9/10

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    Gameplay
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    In a nutshell, the gameplay simply builds on what Halo: Combat Evolved and Halo 2 set the standard to be called "good first person shooting gameplay". And it does a nice job of doing so. The basics remain intact if not had their trigger button rearranged; shooting is the same, so is grenade throwing, switching your weapon, etc. But some new controls were implemented, such as that now, in Halo 3, you pick up new weapons, enter vehicles, and reload with the right bumper, replacing the function for the X button. In Halo 2, the right bumper was either used for your flashlight/camouflage or grenade type-switching (I can hardly recall which), and the X button in the previous two Halo games was used for entering vehicles, picking up new weapons, reloading, and the like. So what replaced the X button's function, and now how do you explain this whole chain-reaction of control rearrangements, you ask? Well, X is now used for various deployable equipment you find in the game, which could range from spawning a dome-shaped shield around you, allowing no fire in or out, to dropping a turret that will protect you from approaching enemies to deploying a handy-dandy Grav(ity) Lift that will spring you up high wherever you put the lift (this is very useful for obtaining a number of skulls in the game). And lastly, the flashlight can be turned on simply with pressing up on the Directional Pad underneath the left analog stick.
    The campaign is fun, especially on Co-Op. A cool new feature is that player one is always Master Chief, and player two is always the Arbiter. This replaces both Halo: Combat Evolved and Halo 2's tradition of both players playing as either the Arbiter or Master Chief, depending on the level chosen. Halo 2's penalty kills in its cooperative play on Legendary difficulty (where you both die if one of you dies) is entirely removed, so that's a plus. Unfortunately, the story does not last too very long, as you could probably run through it start-to-finish in one afternoon. It's definitely shorter than the ridiculously lengthy levels in Halo: Combat Evolved, but hey, Halo 3 has its merits in the campaign to keep things fun. Skulls come to mind. What are skulls, you ask? Good question, Johnny. Skulls are little items that are hidden throughout levels of the campaign. Don't think you can just slide through Easy picking them up, though; they only appear whenever you are playing on Normal difficulty or higher. There are gold skulls and silver skulls; appearance-wise, there is no difference. However, a gold skull will hand out an achievement for finding the skull, and a silver skull will not. That's not to say both are quite amusing in their functions. Finding skulls will unlock options for you to further customize your campaign experience by establishing amusing easter eggs and/or just making things harder on yourself. A notably amusing skull is the Grunt Birthday Party skull; it makes it where whenever you headshot a Grunt, confetti will fly out and you will hear children shout out "Yay!" as though they were attending a birthday party. A difficulty-heightening skull is the Blind skull, which makes everything on your heads-up display go bye-bye, leaving nothing but your sight. Yeah, you don't even see your weapon, let alone the crosshair, so sniping out before being sniped by nasty little Jackals armed with Beam Rifles will be pure hell on ice. Unfortunately, the skulls don't work in the various multiplayer modes Halo 3 sports.
    The multiplayer in the game is same-old, same-old. That is, if you just plop your lazy butt in a simple game of Slayer. This time around, you can create game modes of your own, with options allowing you to toggle things like infinite ammunition and automatically replanishing grenades along with screwing around with the players' starting weapon(s) and speed/gravity. You can also make a mode where all players are camouflaged. This is where you could use your imagination. Forge is basically creating your own game mode, reversed (in a way). It allows you to edit premade maps that which then Bungie will arm you with the ability to transform between your player (which can be entirely customized in appearance) and a Guilty Spark model. Don't worry, the Spark doesn't talk, so there's no need to turn your music up to deafen his voice. Anywho, you, as the Guilty Spark, get to add or delete things from the premade map to make the map, in a sense, your own creation. You can test play with a friend to make sure something works right, and you can do it right there in the same sitting. Pretty cool, eh? It may seem that way at first, but if you don't have Xbox Live (guilty as charged) to get a few new maps including one where you literally create the map, the Forge mode dies off pretty fast. Especially with a confusing budget system that controls how much...er, credit, I suppose, you have left to spend on crap to place in your level. The budget system is also quite pointless, as the only way to make money is to sell already existing stuff.
    All in all, the gameplay is great in the story/campaign, but the multiplayer will die very quickly even if you do have Xbox Live. Gameplay: 9/10

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    Sound
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    The music in the game is quite vague (sans the traditional Halo theme song) though some spots are more obvious than others. Music in the first level or so is exotic, sounding as though a local African tribe composed it. That's a nice touch, but I can't necessarily say that it fits with the game's mood. The sound effects are nice, but I have nothing to complain nor compliment about there. The voice acting is great, and I especially give kudos to the author of one of the Halo books (Joseph...I forgot his last name) for voice-acting the Grunts. The Grunts are literally where all the personality in the game is, as they never seem to run out of new things to say, and they always say it with their current implied emotion. The Brutes are good as well as the Elites in voice-acting, but nothing, NOTHING beats the Grunts in that department. Sound: 9/10

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    Length/Replay Value
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    The campaign is, as mentioned before, somewhat short. But for while it lasts, it is great fun, and with skulls there to make things more difficult, the replay value goes up pretty far. You will want to play the campaign over and over and over again. Then again, what Halo game (Halo Wars doesn't count) hasn't offered a magnificent replay value when it comes to the campaign? By now, we should know it's something Bungie is good at incorporating, and by now, it's a given for campaign replay value to be up in the stars. As for the multiplayer, well, many factors will determine its replay value to you. These factors include whether or not you have Xbox Live and whether or not you find the multiplayer all too interesting. For me, the multiplayer isn't that interesting, and I don't have Xbox Live, so...yeah. Everyone has their cases and opinions. Length/Replay Value: 8.5/10

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    Fun Factor
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    As mentioned time and again, the campaign is where all the fun is; and multiplayer as well depending on your opinions. Fun Factor: 8.7/10

    Overall: 8.7/10, great. Halo 3 certainly picked up where Halo 2 left us hanging, and it may just best Halo 2, even, in multiplayer and campaign. Now, Halo: Combat Evolved, that's a different comparison...
     
  10. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    SPORE

    Note: This review also reviews the extra content provided with the Spore: Creepy & Cute Expansion Pack, and, later, Spore: Galactic Adventures. Peace!

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    Story
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    You control it! I'm being serious here. If you take notes on all of your actions throughout the game and convert them into fanfiction form, you will create an astounding story that never ends.
    But the whole concept is simple. Evolution from a cell to a sentient space traveler, and everything in between those. Done. Story: 9/10

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    Graphics
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    The game itself is enormous and immersive, so as expected the graphics could not be the best they can be. They are buggy. They are glitchy. Some creatures will dip their head into their belly. Some creatures' limbs will become part of the body...despite these, the graphics beat down any second generation graphics with brute force, and besides, the gameplay is where Spore succeeds the most. Graphics: 7.5/10

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    Gameplay
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    I'm forced to explain all of the stages, as they each are entirely different.

    =-=Cell Stage=-=

    When you first start the game, you are forced to start at this stage. Your creature will start as a carnivorous, herbivorous, or later, omnivorous (your choice) bacterium with no brains, only instinct. And your only instinct is to eat---if that means competition, then your little bacterium is all for it. You can start as a herbivore and eat plant bits, or you can start as a carnivore and murder rivaling bacteria, subsequently eating them. Not too long after this, you can give your creature a mouth of the opposite dietary structure, making it possible to end the cell stage as an omnivore, which will help IMMENSELY in the Creature Stage. You also get to arm your creature with natural weapons (especially helpful if you're purely a herbivore) to fight off predators or rivaling organisms. At the start of Cell Stage, you are in a tiny bit of microscopic primordial ooze, but as you eat and kill, you get bigger along with the DNA being added to your current budget (currency for Cell and Creature Stages is DNA). By the end of Cell Stage, you are no longer a bacterium, more like a tiny seaborne animal. As you transition to the Creature Stage, you will be able to have the choice of arming your creature with (very helpful) legs, or not. As said, it's your story! Control your creature's evolution as you wish!

    When ending Cell Stage, you can end with a permanent attribute applied to your creature, which becomes important in the future:

    - Herbivore (friendly) -> This will start you off in Creature Stage as a social species
    - Omnivore (balanced) -> This will start you off in the Creature Stage as an adaptable species
    - Carnivore (vicious) -> This will start you off in the Creature Stage as a predatorial species

    =-=Creature Stage=-=

    The ups and downs to your new permanent attribute is:

    If you were a herbivore,
    Pros:
    - Herbivores and omnivores will often warmly greet you, and it will be easier to ally with other species
    - You get a special ability that makes it even easier to ally others
    - Fruits, the food for herbivores, is plentiful throughout the island
    Cons:
    - Carnivores love a tasty herbivore for lunch
    - If you try to eat meat, you will barf

    If you were a carnivore,
    Pros:
    - Herbivores and smaller omnivores are likely to cower in fear to your presence
    - You get an ability that scares off any nearby creatures
    - Creepy & Cute Expansion Pack gives carnivores some beastly new mouths
    Cons:
    - When you go crazy with forcing creatures into extinction, you can easily screw yourself when all that's left are stronger creatures or Epic Creatures
    - Stronger herbivores and omnivores will not like your guts
    - If you try to eat fruit, you will throw up

    If you were an omnivore,
    Pros:
    - Herbivores and smaller carnivores will greet you warmly
    - You get a special ability that...I'll get back to you on its function
    - You can eat both meat and fruit without puking
    Cons:
    - Larger carnivores will still want to eat you
    - You will get hungry faster than if you were one of the other two dietary habits
    - Your chances of forming a relationship with anything will be hit or miss

    Anyway, though the majority will strongly disagree, the Creature Stage in my opinion is the best. You run around, meet other species, and all that silliness. You get to excavate skeletons to retrieve a randomly generated creature part (albeit one you do not have yet) that you can then buy for a later generation in your creature's evolutionary history. Different parts have different stats; it is very important that you try to max out whatever stat will help your creature most based on its permanent attribute. At the same time, you are trying to form a reputation that will define your personality in the next stage. Will you kill every species in sight and force them into extinction, making you a predatorial tribe? Will you make friends with everyone and be known as a social tribe? Or will you balance out your relationships with other species and be known as an adaptable tribe (making your relationships with tribes in the next stage hit or miss)? The choice is yours! It doesn't matter what your dietary habits are anymore, it's all in what you do in Creature Stage now!

    By the end of Creature Stage, you ultimately determine your reputation that which tribes in the subsequent Tribal Stage will view you as:

    - Social (friendly) -> This will start you off in the Tribal Stage as a friendly tribe
    - Adaptable (balanced) -> This will start you off in the Tribal Stage as an industrious tribe
    - Predator (vicious) -> This will start you off in the Tribal Stage as an aggressive ribe

    =-=Tribal Stage=-=

    Cell and Creature Stages were easily original in their gameplay concepts, never seen before in games. But now, in Tribal Stage, Maxis and EA simply make the gameplay a cutesy-themed JRPG. From here on out, it is difficult to define the pros and cons of your choices, as now you have even more control on your creature's future. After a hilarious cutscene with your creature discovering fire, you become the chieftain with two lackies. You build a simple, caveman-styled hut, and your tribe starts off living like man before 8,000 B.C., possibly similar to that of the Cro-Magnons. You start as the only tribe, as your species was the first to reach sentience. But after about two minutes in the game, a new tribe forms, and it is up to you whether or not to befriend it or destroy it. As for dietary habits, your creature's will remain the same. So whatever your dietary structure in Creature Stage was, you have to stick to the same enchilada in Tribal Stage. You do so by commanding your people to head out and either kill animals, collect fruit, or perform both (if you're an omnivore). If you do so, your men will bring the food back on a plate and place the food on a stone where your totem will later be built on. If you have ten food, you can have a baby for every ten food bits. Babies must be protected for about three or so minutes before they finally mature into adulthood, where they can do anything you assign them to as of then. You can use tools, some which are used for battle, others for alliance. When you ally with a tribe, they sometimes bring you gifts. If you are enemies with one, they will give it their all to raid your tribal grounds and either steal your food or destroy your huts. After you destroy or befriend a certain number of tribes, your hut will grow, allowing more tribe members to be produced. You get an ally's or dead tribe's tools to use when you perform the respective action. The first upgrade transforms your tribe from Cro-Magnon-esque lands into ancient Indian tribal grounds. The second and last upgrade (I think it's the last) changes your tribe into an ancient Greece-esque land. The choices are yours for the picking. Will you destroy every tribe in sight and be an aggressive civilization? Will you make alliances with each tribe and be known as a social civilization? Or will you do what you believe is absolutely necessary with customized circumstances, and become an industrious civilization? As said, the choice is yours!

    The three possible attributes for the transition to the Civilization Stage is:

    - Friendly (friendly) -> This will start you off in the Civilization Stage as a religious civilization
    - Industrious (balanced) -> This will start you off in the Civilization Stage as an economic civilization
    - Aggressive (vicious) -> This will start you off in the Civilization Stage as a military civilization

    =-=Civilization Stage=-=

    This stage comes directly after Tribal Stage, this time being an even higher-level JRPG with more things for you to keep track of. Spice, the stuff you likely saw spitting out of mysterious geysers in Creature Stage (which sent you flying upward when stepped in) is now a treasure to behold. It is the new economic currency. As a new civilization, you mine spice for money. With the money, you buy vehicles and in some cases, other cities. You can now communicate with other cities built around your planet. You can convert the cities' religion, take the city by force, or eventually buy the city out with cleverly scamming them with trade routes that secretly only benefit yourself (when done right). Don't worry your little head about food this time around, because it isn't needed. That's right, food is no longer an issue. Your civilization is capable of maintaining their own food supply. As for spice, you can invest in it and customize all of your cities. There are two factors in spice production: happiness, and production in itself. Happiness ultimately leads to the most beneficial production rate, but no factories in your city means no production. So, it's best to balance the city's structure out and cleverly place the entertainment buildings (happiness-creators) away from the factories (production-increasers). Converting a city through religion does not hurt your relationship with the city at all, but military violence does. Despite this, military take-overs are the easy way out of this stage, because if you quickly take control of cities, you get planes to fly. These are the most efficient vehicles to use, which is why they are not available until a certain number of cities are taken over. Don't even bother building boats---just trust me on that. With vehicles, you can design economic travelers, religious travelers, and military vehicles. As such, with each, you can balance the percentages on each vehicle with three stats: speed, health, and the respective quality (economics, military, or religion). If you give the respective quality more than the other two, though, it will often end up nicely. High-percentaged respective quality stat means better efficiency in that quality, making it easier to become one of the three permanent attributes for Civilization Stage. There's much more to this stage, but it would cover pages and pages and pages of information, so I will move on.

    The three permanent attributes for Civilization Stage is:

    - Religious (friendly)
    - Economic (balanced)
    - Military (vicious)

    =-=Space Stage=-=

    In all honesty, this stage has FAR too much to explain, but I will tell you this: it is amazing. Everything you've done in the past with your creature will determine what your reputation will be in this stage, which can range between warrior and scientist, bard and shaman, and even diplomat. It all depends on what you set your creature up to be. If you don't like your class, you can change it eventually in the stage. But anyway, this stage never ends. Just have fun!

    =-=Creepy & Cute=-=

    The only new things to the Creepy & Cute expansion pack are a few parts to throw on your creature. New mouths, new legs, new weapons, etc. Some parts are beastly, others are cute. :p

    Gameplay: 10/10

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    Sound
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    The music is mostly unnoticable. And when it is noticable, it's calm and quiet. The sound effects are also unnoticable with the exception of the creatures' calls and sounds. Sound: 8/10

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    Length/Replay Value
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    First time through, the game will seem significantly longer than when you play through it again; either way, the game is short for an RPG, in the sense that you can easily beat it within twelve hours. But the replay value is very high; you will want to play from Cell to Space again and again. Length/Replay Value: 9/10

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    Fun Factor
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    It doesn't matter what kind of games you enjoy most, or even if you don't like games at all. This game will be very, very fun for everyone (10 and up :p). Fun Factor: 9.5/10

    Overall: 9.8/10, superb. This game will last for a very long time, and with the new expansion pack, Galactic Adventures coming out with impressive new features, the experience will last even longer.

    Ultimate Ridley out.
     
  11. Overheat Hothead

    Overheat Hothead Custom User Title

    I'm playing through a few PS2 games at the moment. I may decide to write a review or two later.


    This really doesn't make sense. The PS2, GameCube, Xbox and Dreamcast are all sixth generation consoles. The PS3, Wii, and 360 are the seventh generation of consoles. IMO, something like this would be better:

    Opinions?
     
  12. Slick

    Slick Banned

    You clearly missed the point of my post. I was laughing at Night Shadow and Viva la Vida for being morons in the previous "team". I was not laughing at you. You have the right idea for this thread.
    Next time, before you post like a **** (and with this sentence I'm probably being hypocritical), think about what I really meant. In no part of my post did I call you a Night Shadow and Viva la Vida clone.
     
  13. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    Well to tell the honest truth, I'm splitting them up like my buddies at the GameSpot Reviewers Union did...but this is a good idea too.

    [EDIT]I sorted the categories slightly differently. See, more than likely, the seventh generation of gaming is going to receive the most reviews. Thus, that category would be very, very cluttered. That is why I separated them into the different consoles.

    Make sense?[/EDIT]

    Oops. Sorry about that. Guess I overreacted.

    Please ignore that post.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  14. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    POKEMON DIAMOND/PEARL VERSIONS

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    Story
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    Have you played Ruby and/or Sapphire versions? If so, then you already know what the story is. That's pretty damn pathetic on the game's part. Well, the stories between the two generations are too similar to be notable. As always, you are a Pokemon trainer, trying to get eight badges so you can beat the Elite Four and become a...aw you already know what it all is, so why am I even going there? The game takes no fresh, original leaps in this department. If you only like your RPG's story-driven, you will be thoroughly disappointed with Pokemon Generation IV. There's a new team afoot named Team Galactic, and just when you thought Team Aqua and Team Magma couldn't be any more pathetic than they already are, Team Galactic plops its *** into the party. They're even worse. They take any humanity that Archie and Maxie (I can't remember the Team Magma leader's name...augh...) had and totally lack it, seemingly ON PURPOSE. The grunts try to be the Team Rocket brand of pathetic, which said team's is silly and entertaining, but fail miserably at their act. To avoid being called a troll from ranting any further, I will leave it at this: Pokemon Generation IV should NOT be bought for its story. Ever. Story: 3/10

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    Graphics
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    The graphics take a nice leap from the previous generation, going from 2D overworld sprites to 3D overworld sprites. Well, I suppose the better term is 2.5D, as it is difficult to call it 3D. The new sprites are nice as well as the animations. But there's something about the graphics that just feel...out of place. It's hard to explain. Graphics: 7.5/10

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    Gameplay
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    Same old, same old. The only difference with this game is new environments, one hundred seven new Pokemon, a few noticably significant stat change-ups, and the ever-so-wonderful Wi-Fi capabilities. Pfft. Yeah, don't get excited over the Wi-Fi, because in order to battle someone over it, you need their Friend Code and they need yours. You can only TRADE with random people without exchanging codes. Big **** up on Game Freak's part. If it was a memory issue, then it would be understandable, but that is hardly the case. Both trading and battling should be open to random people on Wi-Fi, and if that is too much of a daunting task for Game Freak, they could at least switch the capabilities of Wi-Fi trading with Wi-Fi battling.
    Otherwise, slap everything you know from Pokemon onto the game, and voila! New generation! Yeah, it isn't going to work forever, Game Freak. Better get your brains astormin'.
    On the plus side, the game's metagame is as competitive as ever with surprisingly deep mechanics mostly introduced in Generation III. These include Natures and Abilities. You think you're tough? Go place your team on Wi-Fi and put your self-respect where your mouth is. There are people who treat their lovable bits of data skinned with pixels like robots and breed to perfection and analyze a Pokemon's attack patterns and reactions to your moves to figure out what Nature it is. Personally, I don't give a crap about any of that. But that is also why I do not Wi-Fi with Pearl version. Gameplay: 6/10

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    Sound
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    Next to the spoiled-milk story, the music is the worst part of Generation IV. Why can't they stick to the amazing style FR/LG (FireRed and LeafGreen versions) showed us with astounding presentation of old classic tracks from Generations I and II? No, I don't mean for them to use the same tracks, just stick to the same style of music. But nooooo, this time around, Game Freak threw together a disgustingly annoying, pop-music-y soundtrack. I don't think they tried to annoy us with it, but the case may also be that they just tried too hard with the soundtrack. As for sound effects, they are meh. It is a traditional Pokemon title, after all. Sound: 5/10

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    Length/Replay Value
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    The game is as long as just about any other traditional Pokemon title, but in a sense that is good. You won't find yourself putting the game down for a long time after you beat it, but once you beat it, it is extremely likely that you will not want to start another file on the game to start fresh. Especially if you migrated all of your super-awesome Pokemon from Generation III titles. Length/Replay Value: 8/10

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    Fun Factor
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    It's there. The fun is there. All you have to do is find it, and when you do, all you have to do then is find a way to keep it that way. Fun Factor: 7.5/10

    Overall: 7/10, average. The game is still charming and fun, but that doesn't help the fact that the game is the same old Pokemon. But please, for the sake of appreciating the Pokemon series more, pick up HeartGold/SoulSilver (when they come out) or Gold/Silver/Crystal versions instead. You could find a cheap copy of GSC in good condition online somewhere, I'm sure of it.
     
  15. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    POKEMON GOLD/SILVER VERSIONS

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    Story
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    You have to admit, Pokemon Generations I and II are the best story-wise. Traditional Pokemon games overall do not have plots you would exactly expect from an RPG. But at least RBY/GSC (Red, Blue, Yellow/Gold, Silver, Crystal versions) don't follow the same-old spoiled milk plot that Ruby and Sapphire versions introduced but then had the same plot if not extremely slightly similar carried throughout from Emerald all the way to Platinum, precisely one generation later. As such, Ruby and Sapphire are looked down upon as well for having this same-old plot. And the next generation of Pokemon games is likely doomed to it as well. But as for this generation, the overall concept remains intact: You're a Pokemon trainer striving to get all eight gym badges to fight the Elite Four and become a Pokemon Champion/Master. But that never seems to get old, does it? The plot is just that, but with personality (albeit a small amount), something that Generations I, III, and IV lacked. The game takes place three years after the events of Red/Blue/Yellow versions, so Giovanni has been sort of long-defeated. Team Rocket remains alive and well, however, and they do play some key plot points as a more kid-friendly portrayal of a mafia terrorizing both Kanto and Johto. At least they're not a gang of water/magma/space-phile maniacs who ultimately plan to rule the world, no; Team Rocket just wants money, respect, and for others to fear them. They don't even want Lugia or Ho-Oh! THAT is what a more realistic villain would be like. And they do offer more humor (humor=personality, in a sense) than the other teams in later Generations. And you may even chuckle at times at them; something you will never find yourself doing when facing up to Team Aqua, Team Magma, and Team Galactic. Story: 9.5/10

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    Graphics
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    They are 8-bit, so therefore many people complain about it having cruddy graphics given the time period of its release. Well, whaddya expect from a GameBoy Color game? Assassin's Creed? Yeah right. Get over it, you graphic-discriminate people. The graphics are fine, and you should at least find it playable even if you are that kind of person. They have color, too, something the first Generation didn't have. Graphics: 8/10

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    Gameplay
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    Pretty much the same as Generation I. Same battle style, etc. And there are one-hundred more Pokemon to find, PLUS almost all Generation I Pokemon (sans, of course, the legendaries, and the starters as well as the Kabuto and Omanyte evolution line aren't obtainable without using the game's unique Time Travel doohickey). That's pretty flipping amazing. 'Course, one-hundred Pokemon probably didn't cut it, so they made nearly 90% of the Kanto Pokemon obtainable as well. To top that, this is the only game to feature the ability to travel between multiple regions---well, two regions, considering this is only the second Generation. That's a whole crapload of land to explore. Plus, once the Elite Four is defeated by you, and you have almost all access to Kanto, you have the ability to take on all of the KANTO gyms as well, leading to a total of sixteen badges. In terms of difficulty, it's mainly all at the beginning if you pick Totodile, but the Elite Four is quite the pushover, with the weakest Pokemon at Lv. 42 and the strongest at Lv. 50. Compare that to the current Generation (Diamond, Pearl, Platinum versions) with the weakest at somewhere around Lv. 53 and the strongest at somewhere around Lv. 65. Despite this pushover Elite Four, and that the Gyms in Kanto are only slightly harder, it is extremely easy to train a Pokemon even without the Exp. Share. I received Aeroy the Aerodactyl (nicknamed by his owner) in-game by trading a Chansey for him with a lady somewhere near Fuschia City; he starts at somewhere like Lv. 25. Well, in about a day, without Exp. Share or using my uber-strong Feraligatr to power-level Aeroy, he was close to Lv. 100. That just proves it is easy to train a Pokemon quickly.
    Natures and Abilities don't exist in this game, as they were introduced in the third generation to further amp the popular Pokemon metagame up to the max. So therefore, you people who breed to perfection and use natures and abilities to give your Pokemon EVs (effort values), don't worry about it. If you see a Pokemon you want, catch it, don't analyze its attack patterns to try and figure out its nature, just ****ing catch it.
    So...yeah. Gameplay: 10/10, taking the presentation into account.

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    Sound
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    Also 8-bit, but no one ever complains about music and sound effects being ancient, they only complain about graphics. Neh. The music is great, and very, very nostalgiac. You will enjoy the 8-bit beeps used for music more than the sort of boring orchestral score in later generations, but especially Generation IV (that generation's music suuuucked). As for sound effects, they are also great, and will bring back multiple great memories if you play the game then get back to it years later. Sound: 9.5/10

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    Length/Replay Value
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    Like most Pokemon games, this game is considerably long since it's an RPG. The replay value is up there, high. It's hard to put the game down, and you may even start a new file every now and then, because the game is just that good. Length/Replay Value: 9/10

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    Fun Factor
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    Obviously by now and even in the time period the game was released, Pokemon isn't considered "cool". Those who believe that either conform to popular beliefs or actually did enjoy Pokemon at one point in time, they just exhausted all the fun they could have out on Generation I, and now Generation II, clearly the best generation, is taking the toll. If you like RPGs and don't have anything against Pokemon, this game WILL be fun for you. I guarantee it. Fun Factor: 9.5/10

    Overall: 9.7, superb. As said, get this game if you don't have anything against the series and enjoy the genre.

    Ultimate Ridley out.
     
  16. Night Shadow

    Night Shadow BRRAAP BRRAAP

    Great....Might as well review a game

    Guitar Hero: Metallica
    Wii, Xbox360, PS3, PS2
    Rated T​

    First off, it is us another Guitar Hero Game, but it is amazing (Since Im a Metallica Fan).
    The game is just like all the other Guitar Hero Games, nothing special, except it is Metallica based (obviously). The Story is about a new band who is playing with Metallica. The setlist is like Guitar Hero III but in order to rank uup a new setlist, you have to get a certain amount of stars. There are plenty of great Metallica songs and others lke Am I Evil, Ace of Spades, Turn The Page, Stone Cold Crazy etc. You still have a customized Character. When you play a song not played by Metallica, you play as your character, and if not, you play as Metallica.
    There is new stuff in this GH game such as the double bass pedal. Expert+ is fun but is difficult. Singing could be better but it's decent. Bass works very well and it's more difficult with the open strum note. And for the icing of the cake, the Guitar. Purple/Grey notes (what ever people call them) are bit more plentiful in this game, like songs like One, Am I Evil, King Nothing, and The Memory Remains. Guitar is more difficult in this game than World Tour and can be as challenging as Guitar Hero III. Overall this game really shines Metallica as one of the Greatest Bands of all time.

    Presentation: A cool concept of Metallica throughout the ages of their band history up-to now. 8.0

    Graphics: Metallica actually looks like Metallica. The notes are pretty clear but sometimes during the song, everything looks weird but it then fixes itself. 8.0

    Sound: Great setlist. Metallica, Foo Fighters, Airbourne Toxic Event, Thin Lizzy, Bob Seger, Queen, and Motorhead. 9.5 (Assuming that one likes Metallica)

    Gameplay: There's not a whole lot of new stuff here but the songs are really fun to play. 9.0

    Lasting Appeal: Not a whole lot of songs but will be sure to keep you busy due to the difficulty. The Wii version lacks DLC but has three good Death Magnetic songs. 8.0

    Overall: 8.5
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  17. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    Thanks Night Shadow, for our second not-me review. But which console corresponds with the game in your review? Are you reviewing the Wii version, or another? I just put it under the Wii version as it's the only console named in the body of your review.
     
  18. Night Shadow

    Night Shadow BRRAAP BRRAAP

    It's more Wii based since I have it for the Wii but it is virtually the same game on different systems, probably the only difference is the graphics and DLC for the 360 and PS3. By the way, was my review at the very least, decent?
     
  19. Kabutopzilla

    Kabutopzilla En Prócsem

    HALO: COMBAT EVOLVED

    (or Halo 1 for the uninformed)

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    Story
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    This game started it all. It started the Halo series, and set the standard for an FPS. One of the great things about Halo: Combat Evolved is the story. The story is a nice balance of character-driven-ness and unexpected plot points. The concept is simple: humans fight aliens. Sounds dull at first, but the story isn't actually all that simple. I won't spoil anything. Story: 9.5/10

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    Graphics
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    For its time, Halo: Combat Evolved had state-of-the-art visuals. On the PC, the game looks like it belongs on the Nintendo 64. But on the Xbox, it looks nice. Blocky at times, but overall, very nice. Graphics: 9/10, for its time.

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    Gameplay
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    The campaign is comprised of excruciatingly lengthy chapters progressed through a linear manner. Therefore, Metroid fans who plan to give Halo a first shot, don't try and sequence break. :p No seriously. Don't. There isn't even a sequence TO break in the first place. The chapters are divided up, so you have little freedom to explore. But that's forgivable; the game is amazingly enjoyable, particularly on campaign. The controls may seem like the usual FPS controls, but keep the fact that Halo practically introduced this "generic" control scheme in mind. If you like bosses, you're out of luck. Halo has no bosses. But that's forgivable too. The enemies are at a necessary difficulty, making the game suicide on Legendary and a breeze on Easy. Those who played Halo 3 first and think they're so bad that they'll try this out, bear in mind that ELITES ARE TOUGHER THAN BRUTES. Oh yeah. I went there. On Legendary, hell, even on Easy, Elites can take about five hits with melee attacks before their shields are wiped out, finally leaving them vulnerable. Their shields also recharge. And those are just blue Elites; with red and gold Elites, go ahead and add even more hits to that. Of course, as expected, nailing them in the back will immediately kill them. Brutes on Legendary on Halo 3 take three melee hits, and they're finished. Grunts in this game are tough and gutsy in comparison to the later Halo entries, as even when their Elite commander is assassinated by you, the Grunts stand and fight. Jackals are the same as they are in the later games, so expect nothing different. Hunters are asses until you figure out the trick to killing them: shoot them in the lower back with a Magnum. Instant kill. Drones aren't in the game, and neither are Brutes nor the Prophets. There are fewer weapons in this Halo than in Halo 2 and 3, but inhuman amounts of ammunition allowed on each weapon makes up for that. A good example of this is the Sniper: it allows four shots per clip, and can have a maximum of sixty bullets! The same with weapons goes for vehicles.
    The multiplayer is boring when you go online with it, as every match you will find a hacker, a camper, a cheapshot, or a combination of any of those three. The maps are good, but the inability to play as an Elite hampers the fun of multiplayer. Gameplay: 9.5/10

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    Sound
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    All throughout the game, you will hear the familiar orchestrated tunes that define the Halo franchise. The sound effects are what you would expect from an FPS, and the voice acting is wonderful. Sound: 9/10

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    Length/Replay Value
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    Despite the campaign's enormous length, you will find it difficult to stop performing play-throughs of the campaign. The multiplayer will get old fast, though. Length/Replay Value: 9.7/10

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    Fun Factor
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    The campaign will keep you busy for quite a while, but as said, the multiplayer won't last very long unless you ARE one of the aforementioned hackers/campers/cheapshots. In which case, you will find yourself busting a gut each time you obliterate a pathetic n00b online. Fun Factor: 10/10

    Overall: 9.8/10, superb. Halo: Combat Evolved is easily the best Halo title, and it will be a while before you are bored with it.

    Ultimate Ridley out.

    Decent enough, or I wouldn't have accepted it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009
  20. Overheat Hothead

    Overheat Hothead Custom User Title

    DESTROY ALL HUMANS!

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    Story
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    Ah, the plot. DAH!'s strong point.

    It begins with Cryptosporidium-137 and Orthopox-13, landing on earth to rescue Crypto's clone, Cryptosporidium-136 and extract human brain stems. They are Furons. An alien race who lost the ability to reproduce centuries ago. Out of desperation, Furons were forced to clone themselves to survive. As the years passed and Furons were continuously cloned, errors appeared in Furon DNA and their genetic code became corrupted. Now, they must resort to using DNA from human brain stems.

    Destroy All Humans! takes place in the 50's and is very much inspired by B-movies. As a parody of the science-fiction genre, it extremely funny. Just one example would be Crypto mistaking cows for dominate life form on earth, upon arrival. If you aren't a fan sci-fi and B-movies before you play this game, you probably will be by the end.

    Story: 9.5 / 10


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    Graphics
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    Considering the game was released in 2005, the graphics are ok, but not top notch, especially if you are used to the graphics on your PS3 or 360. Fortunately, interesting character models and environments do help.

    Graphics: 7.0 / 10


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    Gameplay
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    The game is a sandbox style third person shooter / adventure game. The camera system feels smooth and doesn't have any problems. You have many different weapons and mental abilities, including disguising yourself as a human. This gives you a good variety of ways to defeat enemies and carry out missions. A few examples of weapons are the Zap-O-Matic, the Ion Detonator, and the fan favorite, the Anal Probe. As you collect DNA, you can talk to Orthopox to trade it in for weapon and ability upgrades.

    Crypto's weapons aren't the only Furon technology he came to earth with. The alien also brought along a jetpack and (of course) a flying saucer. His jetpack is very useful and also necessary during certain missions. It's a lot faster than walking. If you are anything like me, you'll really enjoy flying around the different environments found within the game. The saucer, on the other hand, left me wanting a bit more. The controls feel a bit clunky, but there doesn't seem to be an obvious way to improve it. The saucer's primary weapon is the Death Ray, but you do unlock more. The jetpack, the saucer and the saucer's weapons are all upgradable.

    Gameplay: 8.5 / 10


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    Sound
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    The voice work in Destroy All Humans! is quite good. Cryptosporidium is voiced by J. Grant Albrecht, a relatively unknown voice actor, known mostly for video games. Jack Nicholson is often mistaken to be the voice of Crypto, due to the way Albrecht speaks when voicing the character. His tone is often sarcastic, which fits Crypto perfectly. Orthopox is voiced by Richard Horvitz, known for being the original voice of Alpha 5 in Mighty Morphin Power Rangers and the voice of Razputin in Psychonauts.

    Sound effects in the game sounds very good, such as when you use your Zap-O-Matic and the music adds to the wonderful B-movie feel of the game.

    Sound: 10.0 / 10


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    Length / Replay Value
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    The main story shouldn't take you more than six or seven hours. If you've played it several times as I have, it'll be even shorter. Aside from the main story, there are several side missions which can be completed.

    Personally, I have replayed the game several times. As I said previously, the strongest point of the game is the story, so a lot of the replay value depends on how much you enjoy the story.

    Length / Replay Value: 8.0 / 10


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    Fun Factor
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    This game is extremely fun. One of my favorite things to do is to stop in between missions and, well... Destroy humans. This can become even more fun if you enter one of the many cheat codes to give you unlimited ammo or health.

    Fun Factor: 10.0 / 10


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    Overall
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    The game is great. Every gamer who also enjoys Sci-Fi should pick this up. This review was based off of the PS2 version of the game, but it also available on the Xbox. On the Xbox 360, it is currently backwards compatible and available for download as an Xbox Original on Xbox Live. It is rated T for Teen.

    Overall: 8.8 / 10


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    [url=http://www.serebiiforums.com/showpost.php?p=9871537&postcount=20][B]Destroy All Humans![/B] - Overheat Hothead - June 17th, 2009 - [8.8/10] (T) - PS2[/url]
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2009

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