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The Student Lounge Thread.

flamebeam

DAYN-JUH ZONE!
I was kinda worried about my calc AP exam. but I did really well, so I can enjoy life until my bio AP exam
 

Moneyy

INACTIVE
I don't know if I should ask this in here or the Questions Thread, but I will just post it anyway: does anyone here go to an Ivy League college or was admitted to one of those schools? I need information on what you should do in order to get admitted. I know it's on the schools' websites, but I think it would be more helpful to hear from someone who has actually had first hand experience.
 
Before anyone questions me for saying this... yes, I am sane. I will honestly say this is probably the weirdest day of school I've had all year, for two reasons. First reason, on my way tolunch, just sitting there on a traffic cone (I don't know either), was a bra? I don't know why, but there was. Then in the hallway there was just a bubble... Just floating there. No one was in the hallway either.

Other then those two things... My day was pretty boring.
 

Kutie Pie

"It is my destiny."
You know, I probably should've just stayed home today. With exception of the substitute, no one showed up in class. All I was doing was drawing out storyboards to begin with, so that's what I did up until five when I decided to go home early (class gets out at five-thirty). So I kinda wasted about four hours at school.

I'm half-expecting to get bonus points for this when the teacher returns maybe tomorrow if not next week. I was the only student to show up for Pete's sake, I deserve a little reward for being determined.
 

Psynergy

Strong Winds
Staff member
Super Mod
I don't know if I should ask this in here or the Questions Thread, but I will just post it anyway: does anyone here go to an Ivy League college or was admitted to one of those schools? I need information on what you should do in order to get admitted. I know it's on the schools' websites, but I think it would be more helpful to hear from someone who has actually had first hand experience.

Well, I didn't bother applying to one, since I didn't want to leave California, though I'm somewhat confident I could have made it into at least one if I tried. The closest thing I have is my acceptance into UC Berkeley, so I have some experience (maybe not the kind you need, but I'll try).

So, GPA is definitely a big advantage, though being ranked 1 is in no way something you need to stress about to get in. Getting as high a class rank as possible should definitely be on your list, though. The person ranked 3rd or 4th in my class (which is lower than my class rank) is going to Cornell, but then she has the advantage of a great SAT/ACT score and lots of extracurricular activities. So obviously, test scores are important, though they're in no way the only factor. I'd suggest checking websites like CollegeBoard for average scores, since in the end, websites like that are a huge asset to making a decision.

One last thing I'd consider is your major, since that can make a difference in whether or not you'll get accepted. For example, in a fair number of schools, engineering will be packed, so unless you're absolutely fantastic and you know it, it will be harder to get in for engineering. This may explain why people with seemingly lower abilities get into a certain college when high qualifying people don't. So even though it's not necessary or mandatory, knowing your major can help your effort.

And when it comes to any recommendation letters and essays, you should look for a teacher who knows you well, and bring them maybe an informal resume, so they know what to include about you. It helps make it more personal. For your essays, which I imagine you'll need to write, make sure you're revising the essay often, and check with teachers to get their opinion for revisions. As far as the topics go, I imagine the goal is for the people reviewing your application to find what makes you unique. So write it the way you want to present yourself, and make it less like what you think they want to hear about you. I seriously wrote about my near-addiction to video games and how I think it contributes to my academic ability, and it evidently worked for getting me to Berkeley.

That's some of my advice with college admissions, though I know that Ivy League schools are different than most, so I'm sorry if this doesn't help you at all. If no one else can help you, then I'd seriously recommend looking at both CollegeBoard and the college's website (CollegeBoard should be linked to them anyway), and maybe talk to your counselor if you can. Whatever you do, if an Ivy League is your goal, then I wish you the best of luck!
 
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flamebeam

DAYN-JUH ZONE!
I don't know if I should ask this in here or the Questions Thread, but I will just post it anyway: does anyone here go to an Ivy League college or was admitted to one of those schools? I need information on what you should do in order to get admitted. I know it's on the schools' websites, but I think it would be more helpful to hear from someone who has actually had first hand experience.

gustavo14 has some good points. I just wanna add that if you don't get accepted to an Ivy League school, it's not a big deal. you can become very successful by attending another school. I'm not trying to discourage you. but it's pretty ridiculous that there are people who think “Ivy or quit life", especially since Ivy decision making processes are so holistic. the fact that you think you can get into an Ivy suggests that you're smart enough to get into a good school, be it Ivy or not, so you'll be fine where ever you go
 
Gustavo covered it for the most part, I need to mention that your standardized test scores are arguably the most important factor. If you attend a less than stellar high school (or a terrible one in my case), then your GPA needs to be near perfect for the courses offered and your ACT/SAT score needs to be at the peak in regards to your school as well.

That being said, I had the highest for both those measures at my school for my graduating class (the highest Act and Sat in quite a while and a flawless GPA), but my test scores were only 89th/90th percentile. I didn't even bother applying for Ivy League because I knew it would be a wasted effort and a waste of $$$ that I didn't have to spare at the time.

I say you want to be at least around the 96th Percentile for SAT and 98 for ACT. That means at least a 32/33 on the ACT, and at least 700/710 for each of you SAT scores. Keep in mind, these are for the 25th percentile of average of the most selective Ivy League schools.. You likely want scores to be a bit higher than the 25th percentile of their students to give yourself a better chance of being admitted; however, it's possible to get accepted with marginally lower scores. For a few Ivy Leagues, a 33 composite ACT puts you near to 50th percentile (the lowest composite for any of them is a 30 for the 25th percentile), so it varies. You can also check the percentiles for each school respectively via any search engine.

And yes, the benchmark ACT/SAT scores for each department within the schools may differ. For example, the Engineering department will likely be more selective.
 
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Moneyy

INACTIVE
Thanks gustavo 14 and Dj06, that helped a lot.

gustavo14 has some good points. I just wanna add that if you don't get accepted to an Ivy League school, it's not a big deal. you can become very successful by attending another school. I'm not trying to discourage you. but it's pretty ridiculous that there are people who think “Ivy or quit life", especially since Ivy decision making processes are so holistic. the fact that you think you can get into an Ivy suggests that you're smart enough to get into a good school, be it Ivy or not, so you'll be fine where ever you go

I know that there are other good schools other than the Ivy League ones, but chances are when applying for a job, I would think that if both candidates are pretty much equal in the interviews and such, the employers would choose the Ivy League graduate over someone who just came from a good college based on reputation alone.
 

ebevan91

Well-Known Member
Here's something else:

If you didn't do so hot in high school, go to a community college and start taking things more seriously. When you transfer, universities will look at your community college transcript, not your high school transcript. My high school GPA is almost a whole point lower than my community college GPA.
 

Zenotwapal

have a drink on me
I don't know if I should ask this in here or the Questions Thread, but I will just post it anyway: does anyone here go to an Ivy League college or was admitted to one of those schools? I need information on what you should do in order to get admitted. I know it's on the schools' websites, but I think it would be more helpful to hear from someone who has actually had first hand experience.

Don't invest all our resources into getting into a Ivy League school.
Just because its an "Ivy League School" doesn't mean your going to get the BEST education ever; its what you make out of your education. You'll learn just as much at a regular state school.
Plus, the Ivy League schools are a bit ridiculous when it comes to applicants. Sure, its almost a given that you have to have high SAT/ACT scores, high class rank, high GPA, and loads of community service, but they judge you on factors you can't control. With today's over political correctness, a lot of schools are looking to "diversify" their campuses. So if your a white middle class male/female with stellar test scores and all that, chances are you're gonna lose to the lower class Hispanic female who might have lower scores than you do, but she'll get the nod because she evens out the statistic.

Point blank, don't bank on getting into the Ivys. It really doesn't matter, I promise you.
I know that there are other good schools other than the Ivy League ones, but chances are when applying for a job, I would think that if both candidates are pretty much equal in the interviews and such, the employers would choose the Ivy League graduate over someone who just came from a good college based on reputation alone.
Yeah uh no
 

ebevan91

Well-Known Member
Didn't feel like double posting so I just deleted my previous post.

Anyway, it's an amazing feeling knowing that you'll still pass a class even if you make a 0 on the final exam. That's the case for my economics final next Thursday.
 
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Moneyy

INACTIVE
Plus, the Ivy League schools are a bit ridiculous when it comes to applicants. Sure, its almost a given that you have to have high SAT/ACT scores, high class rank, high GPA, and loads of community service, but they judge you on factors you can't control. With today's over political correctness, a lot of schools are looking to "diversify" their campuses. So if your a white middle class male/female with stellar test scores and all that, chances are you're gonna lose to the lower class Hispanic female who might have lower scores than you do, but she'll get the nod because she evens out the statistic.

I know. That's quite unfortunate.

Yeah uh no

So you're trying to tell me that someone who goes to Penn State has just as much of a chance of getting a job that someone from UPenn is also applying for, given that both their interviews went relatively the same? I find that extremely hard to believe.
 

Gelatino95

Not a tool
Just got my SAT scores today

Scored 670 in Reading, 700 in Math, and 720 in Writing; 2090 overall

People tell me that it's pretty good, so I'm probably not going to take it again
 

Zenotwapal

have a drink on me
So you're trying to tell me that someone who goes to Penn State has just as much of a chance of getting a job that someone from UPenn is also applying for, given that both their interviews went relatively the same? I find that extremely hard to believe.
A serious employer isn't going to base the decision on alma mater alone. The interview itself has more credibility than the choice of college.
If you are going to a college solely on the name or the label you're better off applying your money else where, seriously. You can get just as good of an education elsewhere at a state school, I promise you.
 

Jb

Tsun in the streets
So you're trying to tell me that someone who goes to Penn State has just as much of a chance of getting a job that someone from UPenn is also applying for, given that both their interviews went relatively the same? I find that extremely hard to believe.

This is the problem with people trying to over prepare for the future. College is college, and a diploma is a diploma. The one who gets hired is the one with the most experience. In the end, what school you go to doesn't really matter. This is why the rate of people starting community college first is higher than ever. Your resume, experience, demand, and interview hold far more weight than what school you go to.

It's not healthy for everyone to think "Well if someone else and I are equally qualified, and happens to be applying to the same job, for the same position at the same time..." Chances are, this won't happen. I mean, it cool to want the best education but don't base it on if. Go for something you like, get good and you'll most likely find success.

Now of course, if it's for a specific field, going to school that solely teaches in that field may help but still.
 
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ebevan91

Well-Known Member
Now of course if you manage to get a free ride at a top school by all means go for it.
 

Gelatino95

Not a tool
I think people tend to get deluded sometimes into thinking that their choice of schools and how much effort they put into their education has a huge impact on their future careers. Of course, getting a high school education is a fundamental requirement in today's world and a college education is also becoming a necessity. But depending on what sort of job you're actually going to have in the future, the alma mater you write on your resume might not actually make that huge of a difference. For the first couple years of their lives, most people's main focus is on their education. It's difficult to consider anything else when it comes to their future. Our society has put such a huge emphasis on education that we tend to think of it as a linear concept: the harder we work in school and the more opportunities we grab at, the more successful we will be later in life.

I'm not trying to decry the notion that getting a good education will help you succeed in life; certainly, having a prestigious school on our record and majoring in something (anything really) can open up more options later in life. But there's a good chance that we're not going to get most of those options anyway.

I guess my bottom line here is to not put so much weight in how well you do in school. As long as you try your hardest and play the game, you're probably going to end up as a functioning member of society someday.
 

Fortunato

Sic Transit Gloria
I finished my semester in pretty good condition

American Lit: A
New Black Poetry: A
British Lit: A
Intro to English Studies: B
Music in Western Civilization: C

All in all I was pretty pleased, this semester marked the end of all of my gen ed courses so now all I have left is the classes to finish up my english degree and I'm at a point where I graduate in about 3 semesters so I'm excited :D
 

flamebeam

DAYN-JUH ZONE!
Just got my SAT scores today

Scored 670 in Reading, 700 in Math, and 720 in Writing; 2090 overall

People tell me that it's pretty good, so I'm probably not going to take it again

2090? yeah, that's okay. not all amazingly terrific... I should've studied for the SATs
 
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