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Things that don’t make sense by Pokemon standards

Luthor

Well-Known Member
Given the past two games allowed you to dress up as a member of a villainous team you'd assume that doing so would get you some odd reactions. Don't get me wrong I love the outfits but from a practical perspective, you'd think someone would raise a few questions. Especially after you become champion.
 

Prof. SALTY

The Scruffy Professor
Given the past two games allowed you to dress up as a member of a villainous team you'd assume that doing so would get you some odd reactions. Don't get me wrong I love the outfits but from a practical perspective, you'd think someone would raise a few questions. Especially after you become champion.
I mean, there's an old guy in Celadon just chilling at his table with 2 rocket grunts in his house and he doesn't even mention it. I don't think regular citizens care that much.
 

NovaBrunswick

Canada Connoisseur
I mean, there's an old guy in Celadon just chilling at his table with 2 rocket grunts in his house and he doesn't even mention it. I don't think regular citizens care that much.
That’s kind of like if two Mafia guys broke into your house and just chilled with you. Even the citizens of Cerulean City and Icirrus City don’t notice that there’s a (former) Team Rocket member living amongst them, and he steals a machine part from the Kanto Power Plant in broad daylight.

At the beginning of Black/White, when Team Plasma gives a speech on Pokémon liberation in Accumula Town, people at least do seem to notice what’s going on, but they don’t know that Team Plasma are a criminal cult masquerading as a Pokémon rights organisation at this point.

Given the past two games allowed you to dress up as a member of a villainous team you'd assume that doing so would get you some odd reactions. Don't get me wrong I love the outfits but from a practical perspective, you'd think someone would raise a few questions. Especially after you become champion.
You mean the bit in Gold/Silver and HG/SS where you disguise yourself as a Team Rocket member?
 

Luthor

Well-Known Member
That’s kind of like if two Mafia guys broke into your house and just chilled with you. Even the citizens of Cerulean City and Icirrus City don’t notice that there’s a (former) Team Rocket member living amongst them, and he steals a machine part from the Kanto Power Plant in broad daylight.

At the beginning of Black/White, when Team Plasma gives a speech on Pokémon liberation in Accumula Town, people at least do seem to notice what’s going on, but they don’t know that Team Plasma are a criminal cult masquerading as a Pokémon rights organisation at this point.



You mean the bit in Gold/Silver and HG/SS where you disguise yourself as a Team Rocket member?

I was thinking more in Let's go Pikachu and Let's go Eevee where you can wear 2 Team rocket outfits and to a certain extent the Alola games where you can dress like team Skull after buying their outfit in Po Town.
 

Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
Given the past two games allowed you to dress up as a member of a villainous team you'd assume that doing so would get you some odd reactions. Don't get me wrong I love the outfits but from a practical perspective, you'd think someone would raise a few questions. Especially after you become champion.
To be fair, the outfit you wear in Let's Go looks nothing like an actual Team Rocket uniform. You just seem to be some sort of Team Rocket fanboy or something.
 

NovaBrunswick

Canada Connoisseur
To be fair, the outfit you wear in Let's Go looks nothing like an actual Team Rocket uniform. You just seem to be some sort of Team Rocket fanboy or something.
What kind of weird person would love a criminal organization that steals Pokémon for money? o_O
 

Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
What kind of weird person would love a criminal organization that steals Pokémon for money? o_O
Even in real life, there sometime tends to be a glorification of criminal orginization. It's strange, but it exists.

Regardless, we have to chalk up people not reacting to the clothes as a video game issue. We can all rest assure that if the NPCs in Pokémon were actual sentient people who could freely speak, then they would probably say something.
 

KyogreThunder

Call of Fate
The fact that defeating Pokemon used by Trainers doesn't award you more experience than the wild ones of the same level in the Alola games. It makes no sense because the Pokemon used by Trainers are stronger than those in the wild.
 

NovaBrunswick

Canada Connoisseur
What really gets me is that in the anime, type advantages exist, but are commonly not adhered to as strongly as they are in the games. Look what happened when Ash tried to use his Pignite against Brycen’s Vanillish in the Unova series, for example. Fire is strong against Ice, so why was Pignite struggling?

The fact that defeating Pokemon used by Trainers doesn't award you more experience than the wild ones of the same level in the Alola games. It makes no sense because the Pokemon used by Trainers are stronger than those in the wild.
The same games where you can find level 10 Salamence in the wild?

Even in real life, there sometime tends to be a glorification of criminal orginization. It's strange, but it exists.
Sort of like what happens with Al Capone and Pablo Escobar, for example.
 

Mega Altaria

☆~Shiny hunter▢~
What really gets me is that in the anime, type advantages exist, but are commonly not adhered to as strongly as they are in the games. Look what happened when Ash tried to use his Pignite against Brycen’s Vanillish in the Unova series, for example. Fire is strong against Ice, so why was Pignite struggling?
Yeah, I find it really weird. It looks as if type matchups aren't a thing in the anime. I think there are some episodes that look into certain type matchups but they aren't covered as extensively compared to the games.
 

NovaBrunswick

Canada Connoisseur
Yeah, I find it really weird. It looks as if type matchups aren't a thing in the anime. I think there are some episodes that look into certain type matchups but they aren't covered as extensively compared to the games.
And then there’s of course the infamous ‘powering up Pikachu with electricity from a power plant’ from the episode where Ash battles Brock. At least it kind of tied in to Rock’s weakness of Water when the sprinklers were activated, thus making Onix weak to Pikachu’s electricity.
 

Mega Altaria

☆~Shiny hunter▢~
And then there’s of course the infamous ‘powering up Pikachu with electricity from a power plant’ from the episode where Ash battles Brock. At least it kind of tied in to Rock’s weakness of Water when the sprinklers were activated, thus making Onix weak to Pikachu’s electricity.
Yeah, that one. I remember that was the way Ash got his first Gym Badge. I remember there were times Ghost-types were hit with Normal-type attacks without Foresight but I forgot which episodes they were in.
 

Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
What really gets me is that in the anime, type advantages exist, but are commonly not adhered to as strongly as they are in the games. Look what happened when Ash tried to use his Pignite against Brycen’s Vanillish in the Unova series, for example. Fire is strong against Ice, so why was Pignite struggling?
It's type advantage, not type dominance. You may have an advantage if you use a super-effective move, but that doesn't mean it's an instant win. A stronger Pokémon can overcome any disadvantage. To use an extreme example from the games, a level 100 Vanillish will almost certainly defeat a level 20 Pignite. I'm not arguing that Brycen's Vanillish was level 100, I'm just trying to make a point that it is possible for a Pokémon with a type advantage to struggle.

Add to that the fact that the games are much more restricted by battle mechanics than the anime. The games show over-simplified battles between programmed monsters with a determined set of stats, while the anime shows more realistic battles between unique and individual beings. In the anime, more than stats and type matter. Strategy, trainer ability, individual power, Pokémon personality, etc. all factor in much more. The simplicity of the battle mechanics in the games lead to things often being a sort of rock-paper-scissors match, while the more complex and natural interactions of the anime allow for things to be a little less cut and dry.

Sort of like what happens with Al Capone and Pablo Escobar, for example.
Basically.

Yeah, I find it really weird. It looks as if type matchups aren't a thing in the anime. I think there are some episodes that look into certain type matchups but they aren't covered as extensively compared to the games.
I assure you that type match ups do indeed exist. They are mentioned plenty of times, and very commonly have had major impacts on battles. They're just not as important, that's all.

And then there’s of course the infamous ‘powering up Pikachu with electricity from a power plant’ from the episode where Ash battles Brock. At least it kind of tied in to Rock’s weakness of Water when the sprinklers were activated, thus making Onix weak to Pikachu’s electricity.
Also, compare that to the Pokémon move Soak. It works better than you would think.
 

Mega Altaria

☆~Shiny hunter▢~
I assure you that type match ups do indeed exist. They are mentioned plenty of times, and very commonly have had major impacts on battles. They're just not as important, that's all.
Even so, I still know that some people like Clemont mention type matchups to predict outcomes for battles. But I never said it was non-existent in the anime as I do remember at least one episode that was focused on one very specific type matchup, which focused on Fairy's immunity to Dragon. Well at least the purpose of it is so we have less predictable battles in the anime after all.
 

NovaBrunswick

Canada Connoisseur
It's type advantage, not type dominance. You may have an advantage if you use a super-effective move, but that doesn't mean it's an instant win. A stronger Pokémon can overcome any disadvantage. To use an extreme example from the games, a level 100 Vanillish will almost certainly defeat a level 20 Pignite. I'm not arguing that Brycen's Vanillish was level 100, I'm just trying to make a point that it is possible for a Pokémon with a type advantage to struggle.
The same thing happened with Ash’s Pikachu after it got hit by a lightning bolt from Zekrom, and he ended up losing to Trip’s Snivy in the next episode. People like to joke that Ash’s Pikachu is level 100 because it can defeat almost anything with a Thunderbolt (including Team Rocket), but the shock of the lightning strike greatly weakened it. This also happened at the start of the Hoenn series where Pikachu got accidentally attached to a magnet, causing a drain of its electrical energy and making it ill.

Also, compare that to the Pokémon move Soak. It works better than you would think.
Soak wasn’t introduced until Gen 5, and the battle with Brock took place during the timeline of Gen 1. Maybe when GF are coming up with new moves for a new generation, they look back at the anime and find some improvised moves to turn into real moves?

But I never said it was non-existent in the anime as I do remember at least one episode that was focused on one very specific type matchup, which focused on Fairy's immunity to Dragon.
Was that the episode with Ash battling Valerie?
 

Bguy7

The Dragon Lord
Soak wasn’t introduced until Gen 5, and the battle with Brock took place during the timeline of Gen 1. Maybe when GF are coming up with new moves for a new generation, they look back at the anime and find some improvised moves to turn into real moves?
My point is that the internal logic of Pokémon remained consistent. Obviously I'm not trying to say that the sprinklers was literally representing the move Soak.
 

Mega Altaria

☆~Shiny hunter▢~
Was that the episode with Ash battling Valerie?
That was in The Clumsy Crier Quiets the Chaos! which was the episode where a Pokémon Center Wigglytuff calmed down a rampaging Salamence. It was an XY episode.
 

shoz999

Sure, sure. Go for it.
My point is that the internal logic of Pokémon remained consistent. Obviously I'm not trying to say that the sprinklers was literally representing the move Soak.
Your talking about how the sprinklers soaked Onix in water making him conductive to electricity and is similar to the move "Soak" there fore making it internally consistent? Nope. Not even a 100% close. A sprinkling of water and using the move "Soak" are two different things. In fact by that logic you could literally apply that to every ground-type who was recently soaked by water, such as Rhydon from the swimming episode or Wooper from Pokemon Generations who was completely immune to electricity even though it was swimming in water. That's just plot armor really. In fact it even makes less sense that this wouldn't be the last time Ash's Pikachu's thunderbolt would beat a ground-type. It isn't even the only Onix to be beaten with Thunderbolt, we would see this again with Roark in the Diamond and Pearl series. But you know what's interesting about this? That poor use of Pokemon logic is very representative of the limitations of the Gen 1 battling mechanics, how Pikachu had no super-effective move during Gen 1 against Onix.
 
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