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Video game violence?

Luxie

Goddess of Lust
Yea because people will learn how to shoot lasers from ther hands.

*looks back at Tom and Jerry where the attacked eachother with standard household items*

NOW THAT'S IMITABLE VIOLENCE!!
 

Malanu

Est sularus oth mith
i just want to point out that only one of the pokemon games has "animal cruelty" as a main theme, and none of them have a main theme of neglect. i believe you are confusing "main theme" with "present in the backstory." yes, there are undertones of parental neglect, and of animal cruelty, but only if you look deep into it. a main theme isn't something like that, it's something the story focuses on, and to my knowledge only one of the pokemon games focuses on pokemon cruelty.
It's not that deep a look Butterfly, however I was exaggerating admittedly...
 

Avenger Angel

Warrior of Heaven
Thing is, you can't ban something that's a part of life. A parent might not want their kid to see blood and gore, but sooner or later they're going to see the grizzly aftermath of a roadkill incident. Or they're going to watch a nature show and see the lions and gazelles and the rodents and the birds of prey aren't best buddies either.

Still, if a kid knows deep inside what's right and wrong, they'll know what goes on in games is a whole other world outside reality, and gets turned off when the controller gets put down and the TV goes off. Same thing with movies, same thing with books. In fact, I'm quite surprised books don't have something similar to an ESRB, because I've seen a lot of books with a lot of extremely descriptive violence and plenty of foul language.

Teach kids what's right and wrong from both a legal and moral standpoint. Enforce things like the ESRB, and things should be fine. Sure, it's impossible to prevent all cases, but so far, it seems to be working well with the vast majority.

Also, kids who become obsessed with stuff like Call of Duty and try to imitate the game should be treated to a week of army boot camp. That should definitely help clear up any misconceptions.
 

Ice Blue Dragon

I belive I can fly!
Thing is, you can't ban something that's a part of life. A parent might not want their kid to see blood and gore, but sooner or later they're going to see the grizzly aftermath of a roadkill incident. Or they're going to watch a nature show and see the lions and gazelles and the rodents and the birds of prey aren't best buddies either.

Still, if a kid knows deep inside what's right and wrong, they'll know what goes on in games is a whole other world outside reality, and gets turned off when the controller gets put down and the TV goes off. Same thing with movies, same thing with books. In fact, I'm quite surprised books don't have something similar to an ESRB, because I've seen a lot of books with a lot of extremely descriptive violence and plenty of foul language.

Teach kids what's right and wrong from both a legal and moral standpoint. Enforce things like the ESRB, and things should be fine. Sure, it's impossible to prevent all cases, but so far, it seems to be working well with the vast majority.

Also, kids who become obsessed with stuff like Call of Duty and try to imitate the game should be treated to a week of army boot camp. That should definitely help clear up any misconceptions.
^this.

Video Games can have violence. As long as people don't buy an AK-47 and start shoting people it is okay.
 

Zachmac

Well-Known Member
Video games have ratings. The only problem is if the parents buy their 5-year-olds a modern warfare game of some sort that's rated T or M, then the parent is an idiot, and the kid is doomed anyway. If it's rated E, the kid probably won't pick up any bad habits.
 

Antiyonder

Overlord
This is just big government anti-freedom, it's been proven that video games don't cause violence or gangs.

This, plus to me censorship just comes off as a way for those in authority to feel like they have control over something, and to feel that they've accomplished something.

I mean how do any of these people rationalize cases of violence that predated video games?
 

pikapikachiu

Well-Known Member
This, plus to me censorship just comes off as a way for those in authority to feel like they have control over something, and to feel that they've accomplished something.

I mean how do any of these people rationalize cases of violence that predated video games?

through scientific inquiry?

Originally Posted by Ununoctium
This is just big government anti-freedom, it's been proven that video games don't cause violence or gangs.

it actually hasnt been proven. there has actually been studies in the past few years that suggest it can lead to violence. but i personally think that if the parents raised their kids right, there should be no problem.
 

DarkGengar

Ghost Reaper
Violence has existed since the dawn of time, Video games are not the cause of it. As cavemen we would hunt them and barbarically kill other animals for survival. We also shamelessly kill one another in war, isn't that encouraging violence in young minds? In general humans are the definition of violence,yet few can actually comprehend this. Even if our US government would put restrictions on violent video games or perhaps prohibit them, violence would still occur.Violent games aren't the cause of young adults and children going out and doing idiotic things, it's poor parenting and the incapability of making a decision without moral value.
 
[img139]http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs70/f/2010/165/e/5/Stomping_On_Goombas_by_AceTheHedgehog2008.gif[/img139]
the horror
i think i'll bash some people's heads in tomorrow
 

3lmi

pimping aint easy
Video games have ratings. The only problem is if the parents buy their 5-year-olds a modern warfare game of some sort that's rated T or M, then the parent is an idiot, and the kid is doomed anyway. If it's rated E, the kid probably won't pick up any bad habits.

I agree, I see a bunch of the kids I tutor in the neighborhood and their parents had bought them MW3 and got it for them at midnight. I can see why their children are always slacking off and need my services.

Atleast I have a secure job for 6 months (or until MW3 gets boring) :>
 

Chaos Emperor

No hope.....
I agree, I see a bunch of the kids I tutor in the neighborhood and their parents had bought them MW3 and got it for them at midnight. I can see why their children are always slacking off and need my services.

Atleast I have a secure job for 6 months (or until MW3 gets boring) :>

And these are the kind of parents who probably complain about violent video games destroying children's minds right?
 

Ludwig

Well-Known Member
Teach kids what's right and wrong from both a legal and moral standpoint. Enforce things like the ESRB, and things should be fine. Sure, it's impossible to prevent all cases, but so far, it seems to be working well with the vast majority.

Rather than teaching moral and laws, teach the reason for those morals and laws. I don't accept any rule that doesn't make sense to me. Anything that's logical makes sense to me and anything that's not logical doesn't make sense to me, which means that only the unlogical (and therefore probably bad) rules gets disobeyed. Learning why it's bad rather than what is bad also implies being able to figure out what else is bad, assuming that else got the same reasons. It does however seem like most people are stupid, which would make my suggestion fail in many cases.

And about this thread's topic, I have played games such as call of duty and counter strike, without experiencing any emotional differences. The moderation thread does state that one should not argue with experiences, but how these games affect the human mind can only be examined with statistics until we understand the brain at molecular levels. And about what to do about the people it does affect, I actually don't care about that unless they decided to be violent against me. I do however disagree with enforcing age limitations, due to the human body (and indirectly mind) evolving at an induvidual pace. A person that is 10 years old could be more fit to play some video games than a person that is 5-6 years older.
 
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